Quantcast

Wyeast 1728 Scottish Ale

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

THE DRUNK ARAB

Zen Arcade
Joined
7/8/03
Messages
2,127
Reaction score
8
I'm using this yeast for the third time on a 70/- Scottish Ale (OG 1040). It was a very simple grain bill, MO/Carapils/Roast Barley.

On the previous 2 occassions that I used this yeast I used quite a bit of dark specialty grain (Dark Crystal and Chocolate) and made 80/- style beers.

My point is tasting this 70/- brew out of the fermenter it is uncanny as to how it has characteristics I can detect in Duvel. Now I believe that Duvel did at some stage use two yeast and Scottish Ale was one of them. Can anyone confirm this?

I don't think I picked this up on the previous two times because of the amount of specialty grain used.

Anyone else noticed this when using 1728?

C&B
TDA
 

Guest Lurker

Big Dog Brewing
Joined
21/11/03
Messages
2,063
Reaction score
2
I used 1728 on half of my barleywine which had no crystal or dark grains. Only tasted it from the fermenter but yes I think I remember some Belgian notes, which isnt really what I wanted, was looking for slightly fruity. Glad I did the other half with 1056 now.
 

GMK

BrewInn Barossa:~ Home to GMKenterprises ~
Joined
18/12/02
Messages
3,699
Reaction score
11
TDA

Ask Wee Stu - he has a book called "Radical Brewing" that states that 1728 yeast was taken from scotland and used in the Belgian Brewery taht brews Duvel.

He can add additional info...hope i have this right.
 

wee stu

wee stu's brury - hand made beers, award winning l
Joined
14/8/03
Messages
1,620
Reaction score
1
I've read in a few places that Duvel sourced the original yeast from McEwan's, making a darkish ale which eventually became transformed into the more familiar golden brew in the 70s.

According to Michael Jackson's Beer Companion (the only beer book I have at work ;) ) says the original McEwans culture was complex (well it was Scottish!) with up to 20 strains identified within it. Over time the complex McEwan's strain has been selected down to two strains.

Wyeast 1728 is, I believe, sourced from McEwans. So the origins of the two yeasts would be the same.

I wanted to see what effect a 1728 yeast would have on a Duvel clone recipe, on the long weekend brewed on GMK's equipment. We had a great day, but let'snot talk about efficiencies :ph34r: The "Devil in a Kilt" brew is now bubbling away with 1728 yeast, will be interesting to see how it goes.
 

chiller

Well-Known Member
Joined
27/4/04
Messages
619
Reaction score
18
Hi TDA,

I've used 1728 on many occassions and agree totally. With a light coloured grain bill there is very litte ester development but, when you introduce chocolate in particular into the beer very strong raisin and plum flavours develop. If the temperature is in the high teens when the fermentation starts you can just about be assured of a Belgian Scottish. Some people incorrectly identify this as crystal cloying. To really see the maximum "Belgian" character in a Scottish beer add Carafa special 3 to the grist.

I love Scottish beers and if you taste a fresh commercial example and "listen" carefully you can taste the raisins, plums and the odd sporran :D
To minimise the effect many Scottish beers limit the dark grains to as little as 50 - 80 grams of roast and little or no chocolate. It is a misconception that Scottish beers are by definition dark beers.

And ferment cool. I'm lazy so ferment at about 20c and have no problems with odd flavours because I limit the dark grains.

Steve
 
J

Jovial_Monk

Guest
A true Scottish ale is fermented at low temperatures, that is why the Scottish ale works down to 13C, then stored at low temps (like, a Scots cellar is bl**dy cold to us, even in their summer)

A Scotch or Scottish Ale is the nearest thing to a lager an ale gets, much closer than the US Steam Beer or Cream Ale classes which are supposed to be semi-lagers.

Most Scotch Ales have roast barley as significant proportion of their grist, e.g. Broughton Old Jock has 300-400g roast barley in a 23l batch.

Low hopping rate, low fermentation temperatures, long cool secondary are what make a Scotch/Scottish ale. Malt is the dominant flavor in Scots ales.

Use the same yeast, ferment warm and you do not have a Scots ale


Jovial Monk
 

THE DRUNK ARAB

Zen Arcade
Joined
7/8/03
Messages
2,127
Reaction score
8
It's fermenting @16C and yeast was pitched on Thursday evening, current gravity is 1021 as of last night so methinks it will be authentic enough with a long primary ferment.
Cheers gents.

TDA
 

MAH

Well-Known Member
Joined
17/3/04
Messages
900
Reaction score
2
Must be the season to brew Scottish Ales. After putting this on my "to brew" list for a very long time, finally made an 80/- last Saturday.

4kg Thomas Fawcett MO
100gm Thomas Fawcett Crystal
100gm Weyermann CaraAroma
60gm Thomas Fawcett Roast Barley

50/50 Golding/Fuggle at 60mins for 20IBU's

OG 1.047

Pitched the 1728 at 16C.

Haven't tasted it yet, but I have noticed it's a lot darker than I thought it would be.

Cheers
MAH
 

Latest posts

Top