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Where to buy CaCl & CACO other than LHBS

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Truman42

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Hey gents do you know where I could get calcium chloride and calcium carbonate from other than a LHBs. I'm doing a brew soon and don't have any and dont have time to run up to Keg King.

Thanks.
 

QldKev

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Try your local pantry/health foods shops. We have Nanna's pantry up here that has some bits and pieces. A lot cheaper than LHBS too.
 

Bribie G

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You can buy calcium chloride from pool supply shops as long as you are prepared to buy enough for the next 20 years in one pack. Tidal Pete gets his that way and gave me a half a kilo ages ago (we both expect to live to 200)
Calcium Carbonate I don't know. And no, not a stick of blackboard chalk - that's calcium silicate or something.
 

Truman42

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I ended up going to KK but thanks anyway. The CHalk was for a stout and although I don't really like to add it my ph would have been under 5.4 without it.
 

drsmurto

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Truman said:
I ended up going to KK but thanks anyway. The CHalk was for a stout and although I don't really like to add it my ph would have been under 5.4 without it.
How do you know your pH would have been out of range?
 

QldKev

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DrSmurto said:
How do you know your pH would have been out of range?
Are you going to post anything useful?
 

manticle

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Truman said:
I ended up going to KK but thanks anyway. The CHalk was for a stout and although I don't really like to add it my ph would have been under 5.4 without it.
Next time try either adding the dark grains to the last 10 minutes of the mash or my preferred method - cold steep cracked dark grain overnight in a covered vessel in the fridge. Bring to mash temp, then add to mash in last 10 or so minutes.

No need for chalk, very smooth result.
 

Florian

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Couldn't agree more with the cold steeping method, works very well, especially in beers where you want more colour than roastiness. I usually add the 'liquid' at the end of the boil instead of mash.
 

QldKev

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Back in 2005 I remember reading on BYO about leaving roasted grains until late. There was a discussion on here at the time, but I can't remember details. The outcome I though was; it is a practice no one actually followed. It seems some people are are doing this? I have a milk stout on the plans, I may give it a go.
 

Truman42

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@ Mants... I usually do add my dark grains the last ten mins of the mash. But this was a commissioned brew.

Me and a couple of guys from work all had today off and they wanted me to brew them a stout.
I have them the option and they wanted it to be roasty so I added them in for a full mash.
 

CONNOR BREWARE

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sounds like a plan to me..

I haven't cold steeped before but have been considering the steeping method so I could split a 40 liter batch of wort up and end up with two styles.

So start with a IPA and drain off the first fermenter through the chiller. Then add the steeped liquid to get a hoppy stout etc. Anyone doing this with good results?
 

manticle

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Truman said:
@ Mants... I usually do add my dark grains the last ten mins of the mash. But this was a commissioned brew.

Me and a couple of guys from work all had today off and they wanted me to brew them a stout.
I have them the option and they wanted it to be roasty so I added them in for a full mash.
If you cold steep overnight, you still get the flavour benefit without the astringency nor (what is most relevant to this thread) the effect on pH.

The main reason i mention it is as an alternative to adding chalk to maintain pH in dark beers. Smooth can still include roast and roast can be smooth.
 

Mardoo

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manticle said:
If you cold steep overnight, you still get the flavour benefit without the astringency nor (what is most relevant to this thread) the effect on pH.

The main reason i mention it is as an alternative to adding chalk to maintain pH in dark beers. Smooth can still include roast and roast can be smooth.
So Manticle you leave the grain in the cold steep, bring to mash temp and add in the last 10 minutes. You don't strain out the grain, correct?

Cheers for this.
 

QldKev

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manticle said:
If you cold steep overnight, you still get the flavour benefit without the astringency nor (what is most relevant to this thread) the effect on pH.

The main reason i mention it is as an alternative to adding chalk to maintain pH in dark beers. Smooth can still include roast and roast can be smooth.
But don't you want some of the dark roasty bitter coffee like taste in a stout? Or do you steep a lot extra to make up for it?
 

Truman42

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QldKev said:
But don't you want some of the dark roasty bitter coffee like taste in a stout? Or do you steep a lot extra to make up for it?
Yeh Im curious to know this as they wanted that dark roasty bitter coffee flavour in this stout. I thought steeping would only add colour and some roastiness without the bitterness?
 

bum

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manticle said:
If you cold steep overnight, you still get the flavour benefit without the astringency nor (what is most relevant to this thread) the effect on pH.
 

manticle

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Bum has it. By cold steeping, you get all the right flavours - you just don't need chalk to adjust your pH.
I don't like chalk much.
Stout might be smooth but it is still roasty.
 

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