Quantcast

When It's Time To Chuck....

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

The Duke

Active Member
Joined
16/9/04
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
Just read of the stinky Bavarian Lager tale.
A brew has to be pretty bad for me to chuck it but when it is I find it very hard to just tip it down the sink so I find myself trying to come up with other uses for it.
One use is in the garden. A brew in an icecream container sunk in a garden bed is a bloody magnificent way to kill snails. They are raging alcoholics and basically drink themselves to death.
Wondering what uses other brewers may have for their failures?
Personal lubricant? Shampoo? Skid mark remover?
 

barfridge

Small fridge, powerful thirst
Joined
14/5/04
Messages
1,043
Reaction score
1
All I could use my bad brews for would be chemical warfare.
 

morry

Well-Known Member
Joined
16/9/04
Messages
190
Reaction score
0
I made one that would probably work well at unblocking drains. The sink flowed really well once I poured it all away.
 

Kai

Fermentation Assistant
Joined
1/4/04
Messages
3,734
Reaction score
17
Anyone have any good recipes for vegemite?
 

Backlane Brewery

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/12/04
Messages
397
Reaction score
0
saw this throwaway line from Kai recently:
[/QUOTE]Anyone have any good recipes for vegemite?
and it got me wondering. So I had a look (on Google of course)

There is another thread somewhere that talks about autolysis giving rise to Vegemite-y flavours, I guess this confirms it.

"Brewer's yeast is a good source of vitamin B, but live yeast tastes boring, it is poorly digested, and it can even strip vitamin B from the gut. Inactivated yeast lacks the disadvantages, but is still bland. The answer is autolysis: using the yeast's own enzymes to break it down.
Spent brewer's yeast is sieved to get rid of hop resins, and washed to remove bitter tastes. Then it is suspended in water at a temperature greater than 37 C with no nutrients: the yeast cells die, and vitamins and minerals leach out. Then the proteolytic (protein-splitting) enzymes take over, breaking the yeast proteins down into smaller water-soluble fragments, which also leach out.
The yeast cell membrane is unruptured during this time, and can be removed by centrifuging. The clear light brown liquid is then concentrated under a vacuum to a thick paste (the vacuum helps preserve flavours and vitamin B1, thiamine). It is seasoned with salt, and a small proportion of celery and onion extracts to increase the palatability. Only sissies buy anything less than a 227 gram jar."

Anyone got a centrifuge? Could knock up a batch as the finale to a big brew session.
 

Rubes

Well-Known Member
Joined
16/4/04
Messages
166
Reaction score
0
You could distill it?
 

taflex

Well-Known Member
Joined
9/12/04
Messages
60
Reaction score
0
The Duke said:
A brew in an icecream container sunk in a garden bed is a bloody magnificent way to kill snails. They are raging alcoholics and basically drink themselves to death.
BWAHA! Nice one. Raging alcoholic snails... there's gotta be a movie in that, or something.
 
P

phantom

Guest
taflex said:
The Duke said:
A brew in an icecream container sunk in a garden bed is a bloody magnificent way to kill snails. They are raging alcoholics and basically drink themselves to death.
As a horticulturalist I would like to say that this is a very old method of ridding your garden of slugs and snails and is in vogue with current organic trends.These buggers love yeast and drink until they drown.its as if your helping them to suicide happily.
And no threat to the kiddies or the dog as with those pellets.
 

deebee

The Bludgeon Brewery
Joined
12/6/03
Messages
1,174
Reaction score
0
Beer also works as bait in fruit-fly traps.
 

Latest posts

Top