When and how to keg my wort kit

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ThiagoALG

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Hi guys,

I heard that wort kits were the easiest thing out there, so decided to have a go at it. My OG was 1.046 and now getting to 1.010 so getting there! Im trying to figure out when and how I should put the product on a keg. Questions :
-Aside from having my keg squeaky clean, do I need to add anything to it?
-What is the best method to transfer the beer into the keg? Should I use a hose and gravity (siphon)?
-Im used to bottling, and you add some sugars when you do... Does the CO2 does all the job?
-For how long should I leave it pressurised in the keg before I can drink it? Should the keg be refrigerated or just room temperature (at Sydney winter ranging at my place between 10-20c)?

I did spend 30 minutes trying to find out the answers but maybe because this is supposed to be very straight forward, had no luck. Besides, maybe its time for me to join a forum if I am to be serious about this!

Thanks in advance for the help!

Cheers
 

Thomas Wood

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I've only done this once, second will be tonight, but here is my (current) process:

0. Check your hydrometer 2-3 days in a row and make sure the FG hasn't changed
1. Wash kegs and push through lines
2. Sanitise kegs and push through lines (already done. Did all 3 kegs at once).
3. Add some CO2 to keg to reduce O2 exposure
4. Transfer beer from fermenter spigot via tube to the bottom of the keg, reduce splashing as much as possible.
4.a I am going to experiment by transferring from spigot to liquid OUT post tonight
5. Seal keg up and put in fridge
6. Either set to serving pressure and leave for a week, or set to 35 PSI for 36hrs and then reduce to serving pressure.

I should also note that the colder the beer the more CO2 it will absorb. How carbonated you want it also depends on style.

EDIT: I also always cold crash before transferring to keg/bottles too
 
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ThiagoALG

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Hey Thomas! Thanks for the reply! Helps a LOT!
On the step 4, how worried should I be about getting sediments on my keg? I noticed whilst taking some samples that quite a bit of sediment is coming on it. Might be cuz its not 100% finished yet, but though that maybe instead of using the tap at the bottom of the fermenter, i could try to use a siphon and only grab from the middle, leaving all the bottom behind....
I also forgot to ask on my first question: If I want to bottle some of it, is it possible to just pour from the tap once its finished into some bottles? Meaning same state you were gonna drink it... or is it gonna lose all the gas?

Thanks!
 

Bonenose

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My method is much the same as. Cold crash also means that your beer is already cold when you keg so you can force carb and, depending on style of course, be drinking within a day or so.
I will start by filling a couple of stubbies, this gets rid of any initial sediment and then fill your keg should be running clean by then.
You can get counter pressure fillers (not sure if that is the actual name) for filling bottles from your keg. Have not used one myself but know a lad that had a little mini brewery set up and he used one to fill all his stubbies.
 

Rocker1986

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Thomas's method is pretty much what I do as well. Before filling I usually drain a couple of glasses from the fermenter to clear the tap and surrounds of sediment as much as possible then slowly transfer to the keg. I usually drink the second glass even though it's flat, because it is cold and usually tastes reasonable enough not to waste it. Yeah you'll get a little bit of sediment in there probably but it doesn't really matter, it will just settle out into the bottom and sit there.

I brew a fair few 25 litre batches, which are obviously too big for a 19L keg on their own, so instead of bottling it I bought a 10L keg so the surplus 5L or so from two separate batches goes into that 10L keg to make a blended beer. Most of the time they turn out pretty nice too.
 

Thomas Wood

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I always cold crash and add finings so I don't get sediment. It's not harmful to get in the keg or glass, but could block your dip tube.

As for pouring from your tab; it would be best to hook up a tube to the bottom of the glass so that you don't splash and oxidise the beer.

4.a I am going to experiment by transferring from spigot to liquid OUT post tonight
PS. I did this last night and it worked well, except one stuff up. Make sure you purge your fermenter off gas before you hook up! I sprayed star san all through the garage lol. I also had to vent excess gas every little or so to keep the liquid flowing.
 

ThiagoALG

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Guys, Thanks for all the help provided. Will be doing this on the next couple of days and let u guys know how did I go.
Cheers!
 
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I use an auto siphon with a hose to the bottom of the keg. It has the red hat on it so doesn't pick up too much trub.

I always cold-crash prior which drops anything out of suspension in the beer and aids with CO2 absorption.

I used to use the 2 min 50 PSI method, but now just connect CO2, purge a few times and let sit for a week before pouring.
 

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