Wheat malt vs. Raw wheat

Discussion in 'Grain, Malt and Adjuncts' started by Doctormcbrewdle, 10/1/18.

 

  1. Doctormcbrewdle

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    Posted 10/1/18
    I've been digging around but can't seem to find much about this. What's the difference (taste, yield, ebc etc) between malted and raw, unmalted wheat malt?
     
  2. MHB

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    Posted 10/1/18
    You really should do a bit of reading up (google it), its quite a complicated question (along the lines of grandma asking how TV works)
    It hasn't the available enzymes of malted wheat, these are produced during malting, the protein and glucan structures that hold the starch granules together haven't been "modified" during malting so they are much harder to get at.
    To get the most out of unmalted cereal adjunct (any grain) it needs to be milled, and in many cases or if used at high levels be boiled to break out the starch granules and to make them available to the enzymes from the base malt.
    You really should do a step mash, to activate Glucanase and some of the Protease to break down the B-Glucans and Protein, less important if you use Flaked or Torrefied grain.

    Also, not all Wheat is created equal, with barley there are special breeds grown for malting and brewing, not the case with Wheat, the most desirable wheat for bread/pasta... is the least useful for brewing, being high in Glucans and Protein. So be careful which wheat you use, brewing quality wheat is nearly as expensive as malted wheat (doesn't make sense on one level, its down to supply and demand)

    Any unmalted grain will add a slick creamy mouthfeel to the beer, it will also make the beer cloudy.
    You (as above) need to do some more reading, and probably some experimenting.

    Free tip - If you are milling your own grain, doing a bit of raw wheat by hand is about as good as a workout at the gym (has been known to stall many drills and to smoke a few motors.
    You will also need to take a long hard look at your mill gap, best is to mill the wheat separately, several times starting at just touching the grain, then stepping down until you have a fine kibble with little flour - that will build up your chest arms and probably legs.
    Mark
     
  3. Doctormcbrewdle

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    Posted 10/1/18
    Thanks for that Mark! Lots of good info there

    Would it be wise to boil AND step mash, too, or is one or the other fine?
     
  4. thumbsucker

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    Posted 10/1/18
    When ever I make a Witbier. I use fine grain white / pale bulgur, basically its wheat that has been cracked and then gelatinised, you just throw it into your mash as any malted grain. It will give you the flavour of raw wheat but you do not need to do any extra work. Its cheap, my local Arabic shop sells its for $2.75 a kg.
     
    Last edited: 10/1/18
    EalingDrop and technobabble66 like this.

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