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What is more energy efficient ?

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Smoop

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What would cost less to run ?

A temperature controlled fridge or a temperature controlled freezer ?

I know there are a lot of variables but what do you guys think ?

Has anyone done any type of tests on this type of thing ?

Everyones feedback is welcome :)

Thanks.
 

QldKev

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I think most people will say freezer, because that's what we a re all told.

I have a side by side fridge / freezer combo (pigeon pair), they use the same power at the same temperature (measured).

I believe a chest freezer is supposed to use less power as when you open it you loose less cold air, but I don't have one to give a fair test on my meter. I don't personally think it will make a huge difference unless you open the door many times a day.

I have a "power consumption" thread on here with a lot of measurements.

QldKev
 

micblair

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I like the added space a chest freezer gives me, and the fact I can fit a few kegs or a couple of fermenters, thats what I've based my decision making around when I sold my fridge.
 

Smoop

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QldKev said:
I think most people will say freezer, because that's what we a re all told.

I have a side by side fridge / freezer combo (pigeon pair), they use the same power at the same temperature (measured).

I believe a chest freezer is supposed to use less power as when you open it you loose less cold air, but I don't have one to give a fair test on my meter. I don't personally think it will make a huge difference unless you open the door many times a day.

I have a "power consumption" thread on here with a lot of measurements.

QldKev
Thanks Kev, I will have a read of that thread right now.
 

Smoop

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micblair said:
I like the added space a chest freezer gives me, and the fact I can fit a few kegs or a couple of fermenters, thats what I've based my decision making around when I sold my fridge.
I did not think of that mic. you have a great point.
 

Nick JD

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I would think the opening method would have a big impact. Top lid doesn't let the cold spill out. That'd add up.
 

AndrewQLD

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We just bought a new fridge and the salesman did a calculation using the energy efficiency rating to estimate how much the thing cost to run per year, the same can be done for a freezer. Obviously this wouldn't include opening and closing of doors but does take into account the insulation properties of the fridge/freezer.
Sadly I was so f@rking bored after 3 hours of looking at fridges that I failed to register the calculation details.
 

Smoop

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Nick JD said:
I would think the opening method would have a big impact. Top lid doesn't let the cold spill out. That'd add up.
Simple science and it never even crossed my mind. Thanks.
 

Smoop

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AndrewQLD said:
We just bought a new fridge and the salesman did a calculation using the energy efficiency rating to estimate how much the thing cost to run per year, the same can be done for a freezer. Obviously this wouldn't include opening and closing of doors but does take into account the insulation properties of the fridge/freezer.
Sadly I was so f@rking bored after 3 hours of looking at fridges that I failed to register the calculation details.
I did not know the rating had an actual formula for working out actual power consumption. Handy to know.

So many things I had not thought about but were staring me right in the face. Thanks for your input guys.
 

Nick JD

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Smoop said:
Simple science and it never even crossed my mind. Thanks.
Popping the disc between your S1 and L5 vertebrae lifiting things in and out of a chest freezer is also simple science. :D
 

AndrewQLD

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Here's a bit more info,


The Energy Rating Label has two main features that provide consumers with the following information:
  • The star rating gives a comparative assessment of the model’s energy efficiency.
  • The comparative energy consumption (usually kilowatt hours/year) provides an estimate of the annual energy consumption of the appliance based on the tested energy consumption and information about the typical use of the appliance in the home. Air Conditioners show the power consumption of the appliance (kW or kWh/hour).
The Star Rating of an appliance is determined from the energy consumption and size of the product. These values are measured under Australian Standards which define test procedures for measuring energy consumption and minimum energy performance criteria. Appliances must meet these criteria before they can be granted an Energy Rating Label.
 

Smoop

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AndrewQLD said:
Here's a bit more info,


The Energy Rating Label has two main features that provide consumers with the following information:
  • The star rating gives a comparative assessment of the model’s energy efficiency.
  • The comparative energy consumption (usually kilowatt hours/year) provides an estimate of the annual energy consumption of the appliance based on the tested energy consumption and information about the typical use of the appliance in the home. Air Conditioners show the power consumption of the appliance (kW or kWh/hour).
The Star Rating of an appliance is determined from the energy consumption and size of the product. These values are measured under Australian Standards which define test procedures for measuring energy consumption and minimum energy performance criteria. Appliances must meet these criteria before they can be granted an Energy Rating Label.
Awesome info. Thanks again.
 

Online Brewing Supplies

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Local ambient will also have an impact.
From experience a freezers will die way before a fridge dies.
Most FRZ rust out the coils inside the walls with no way to fix.
Bit like Fords and Holdens really.
Nev
 

Smoop

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Gryphon Brewing said:
Local ambient will also have an impact.
From experience a freezers will die way before a fridge dies.
Most FRZ rust out the coils inside the walls with no way to fix.
Bit like Fords and Holdens really.
Nev
Just when I think a freezer is more value for money you go and make me think more Nev. It's getting a little hard to do that 7 beers down.
 

punkin

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So a fridge may last thirty years and a freezer 28 years.
 

QldKev

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Good point raised by Andrew with the ratings. Anyone who has read my power consumption thread would see I referenced the Westinghouse website as they have the star ratings online, along with the kw per year.

300L Upright Freezer is rated to 525 KWhr/yr, which @ 25c per KWhr = $131 per year
320L Chest Freezer is rated to 400KWhr/yr, which @ 25c per KWhr = $100 per year

So using my local power cost, you would save $31 a year with a chest freezer. But with a homebrew fridge we generally open and close the door less, so the factor of cold air dropping out of an upright will be reduced, and I believe reduce that $31 difference even more.

I use a chest freezer for grain storage, so the only time I'm lifting into it is when I get a new bag of grain. I know they feel heavier lifting into the freezer then you expect. I've got 320L upright fridge holding 3 fermenters and a 320L upright freezer I use for kegs, I do find it a lot easier to put them in than leaning over the side of a chest freezer.


Also a few good other points raised, when you look at reliability the total cost of ownership comes into play and not just the power usage. Especially the one about damaging your back lifting into and out of a chesty, do some permanent damage to your back and I bet you would wish you didn't opt to save a couple of dollars.


QldKev
 

stux

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And I think the maths goes completely out the window if you're going to run a temperature controller
 

Nick JD

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For sure. Running a freezer at 5C instead of -18C will reduce that $100 pa by half at least I'd guess, maybe more. So the differences may approach zero.
 

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