Quantcast

W1056 Starter Tastes Like Apple Juice?

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

Steve

On the back bloody porch!
Joined
10/6/05
Messages
4,656
Reaction score
100
Im making a starter for tomorrow and took my W1056 starter out of the fridge. I use the grumpys method and draw off 400mls when making the 1.5l starter and put that back in the fridge for next time. I smacked this one 2 July and have done 3 brews with it. I took the lid off and it smelt like a malty apple - really strange smell...so poured a bit in a glass and it tastes like apple juice??? I will carry on and make the starter and see if it fires (now that the malt is cooling down). Is it infected do you think? Ive never had a starter smell or taste like apples. If its infected would the starter fire? Any ideas? I dont want to use it in my APA if im unsure.
Cheers
Steve
 

sluggerdog

Beer In Here
Joined
12/10/04
Messages
1,865
Reaction score
26
At a guess I'd say it is fine. Your supposed to get a cidery taste when you ferment at high temps which is what happens when you do starters.

I wouldn't worry about it, see how the start goes, if it works your in business, just dump the liquid on top and pitch the yeast, too easy!~
 

Jazzafish

Fermentation is my bitch
Joined
19/7/05
Messages
972
Reaction score
17
Maybe this quote will help with an explaination? How did the previous starter taste?

ACETALDEHYDE
CHARACTERISTICS: Acetaldehyde is the flavor and aroma of green apples. It can also taste and smell acetic/cidery.
CHEMISTRY: Formed as a precursor to alcohol by the yeast, or as a product of the oxidation of alcohol to acetic acid.
CAUSES: Yeast metabolism (fresh-cut apples) uses acetaldehyde as a step in the production of alcohol from glucose. This is a fresh, fruity flavor. The second cause is the oxidation of alcohol to acetic acid, whether by oxidation or by acetobacter (gram-negative). This flavor will be more vinegary and less pleasant.
PROCESS: As a product of yeast metabolism, it can be caused by the strain itself or by premature termination of the yeasts fermentation, such as oxygen depletion, premature flocculation, etc. such that the reaction from glucose to alcohol is stopped at the acetaldehyde stage.
The other causes are oxidation and contamination by acetic acid bacteria. This will occur during splashing when racking quiet beer (non-kraeusened) and bottling.
REMOVAL: Use a good yeast strain that will attenuate the wort properly. Oxygenate the wort at yeast-pitching time. DO NOT splash or oxygenate the wort when racking or bottling. Long lagering periods will also reduce acetaldehyde.
EXAMPLES: Budweiser deliberately manipulates their yeast and process to give 6-8 ppm acetaldehyde in the beer.
 

Steve

On the back bloody porch!
Joined
10/6/05
Messages
4,656
Reaction score
100
Cheers Guys
After much pondering and umming and arrring I made the starter last night. It didnt fire up...the apple smell and taste turned into vinegar. Down the drain. Glad I only wasted 150gms malt and not 27 longnecks.
Steve
 

Mr Bond

Well-Known Member
Joined
2/7/05
Messages
1,373
Reaction score
2
:) Maybe you shoulda pitched it into apple juiceand done a cider !
 

Latest posts

Top