Quantcast

Vert Wyrt Wrt Or Wort

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

kieran

Well-Known Member
Joined
29/1/06
Messages
257
Reaction score
7
Hi all.

I wrongly pronounce Wort as it looks. I know most pronounce it wrt.. (phonetically wert).
That's cool and all, but after living with a german for 2 years, i know they wouldnt pronounce it 'wert'.. It would be pronounced 'vert'.
But that's assuming that the 'o' is pronounced as an 'oe' because it is of german origin (the oe is a way of spelling an umlaut typset o, ie. ) .
But then I saw somewhere that in old English it was Wyrt. Now that would make sense from both a spelling and phonetic pronunciation standpoint.

Anyway, can anyone shed any light on the subject. I'm curious.

Cheers
Kieran
 

Lecterfan

Yeast, unleashed in the East...
Joined
15/8/10
Messages
2,062
Reaction score
333
There are almost certainly bound to be many linguistic/etymological specialists out there, but my experiences in other fields has been that 'Old English', a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon is largely Germanic/Teutonic in origin thus wyrt/wort (with the umlaut I don't know how to type) is not much more than a regional difference and would have little impact on pronunciation. The 'y' in Anglo-Saxon spelling largely plays the role of a number of vowel-consonants combos or singulars, depending on its context, but in a capitalised form such as 'Ye Old...' it actually is more likely to be representing a bastardisation of the rune from the 'futhark' which represents 'th' (thus 'The Old...' rather than 'Ye Old...'), Airgead may well know more about that (wiki has some stuff on the the 'thorn' rune). Bearing in mind this teutonic link, the 'w' of wyrt would almost certainly be pronounced 'v'yrt back in the day, but then also bear in mind that the huge impact of Anglo-Saxon culture (linguistically - but it can't be underestimated, it is the main etymological source of our day to day English, outdone possibly only by Latin which it often shares anyway) only happened over a relatively brief period of time before the Normanisation (for want of a better term) of things (when, for example, we made a distinction between cow and beef, due to the introduction of the Franko-Norman 'boeuf' to the language). People often scoff at the difficulty and inconsistency of the English language, but it actually reflects a rich cultural melting pot of the Northern European dialects, and allows us infinite nuance for those who give a shit.

One of my supervisors is german, and she is happy to use (phonetically) 'vert', and I see no reason to quibble at this term...but when I'm on the phone to a friend we often say 'wart' and neither of us miss a beat.


YMMV, as they say. :icon_cheers:

edit: I feel incredibly foolish if this is an in-joke, elbow-in-the-ribs, wink wink type situation...in which case I have fallen prey and have hopefully provided much eye-rolling amusement.
 

Nick JD

Blah Blah Blah
Joined
4/11/08
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
453
I'm not sure how to say, "Kieran".

Is it kay-ran, or key-ran or keer-an, or kee-ren?
 

Florian

Back On Track
Joined
23/2/10
Messages
3,011
Reaction score
656
In German it's Wrze [ˈvʏrt͜sə] or more specific Bierwrze [ˈbiːɐ̯vʏrt͜sə], so the old English Wyrt is probably closest, but is missing the second syllable.

In English I pronounce it wrt (like 'word' but with a t instead of d), not because I know that that's how it's pronounced but because that's the way I picked it up from others. A friend of mine who used to work in a brewery a decade or so ago pronounces it wort as in sword, again with a t and obviously without the s.
 

Nick JD

Blah Blah Blah
Joined
4/11/08
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
453
I've noticed the use of the "correct" pronounciation is largely weighted on the wankiness of the subject.

We don't say fee-lay (fillet), but we say bell-ay (ballet).

It's fuckin wort. Like the Witch's face. Poofs. :D
 

kelbygreen

Crazy Clown
Joined
28/11/09
Messages
2,850
Reaction score
21
I always got pulled up in english! the teacher would pick out my words and say that letter is silent!, Well if its silent why the **** is it in there??? like knife nife, elephant elifant. I spelt the words out how they sounded its not my fault some stupid **** made letters silent lol or if you put a e at the end the whole word sounded different!
 

sim

Well-Known Member
Joined
21/9/08
Messages
442
Reaction score
1
I've noticed the use of the "correct" pronounciation is largely weighted on the wankiness of the subject.

We don't say fee-lay (fillet), but we say bell-ay (ballet).

It's fuckin wort. Like the Witch's face. Poofs. :D

no thanks, wort rhymes with skirt for me. not so hard to do.
 

felten

Homebrew Conjecturist
Joined
13/5/09
Messages
2,536
Reaction score
45
fill it mig non

I say wert, only because I was told that's how its pronounced when I started out
 

Truman42

Well-Known Member
Joined
31/7/11
Messages
3,966
Reaction score
605
While were on the subject is it troob or trub.

And is hefeweizen heffa wizzen heffa weezen heffe wyzen (Ive heard it pronounced all 3.)

Potato Potarto, Tomato tomarto?? Its all so confusing... :rolleyes:
 

Mr. No-Tip

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/9/11
Messages
920
Reaction score
277
While we're there... (or is it Wile where their?), what about Reinheitsgebot ?

I don't think I'll worry too much. I totally stuff up the pronunciation when I pronounce it "German purity law"....even worse when I am drunk and pronounce it "German's scared to put some bloody adjuncts and spices in their beer law".
 

Dave70

Le roi est mort..
Joined
29/9/08
Messages
5,443
Reaction score
3,109
Sugaz?

Rice gulls?
 

Dave70

Le roi est mort..
Joined
29/9/08
Messages
5,443
Reaction score
3,109
fcuk or f**k?
 

MHB

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/10/05
Messages
6,005
Reaction score
3,446
Location
Newcastle
I was told by an IBD master brewer, quite emphatically that its pronounced wert, Ill take the opinion of a brewer with 50 years experience, a PhD equivalent in brewing and who has personal experience brewing on 5 continents at face value.
Mark
 

spudfarmerboy

Well-Known Member
Joined
23/6/10
Messages
161
Reaction score
24
I was told by an IBD master brewer, quite emphatically that its pronounced wert, Ill take the opinion of a brewer with 50 years experience, a PhD equivalent in brewing and who has personal experience brewing on 5 continents at face value.
Mark
Thats it, its all over.
End of thread.
 

MHB

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/10/05
Messages
6,005
Reaction score
3,446
Location
Newcastle
Well I could have said I had my pronouncing of wort corrected by a master brewer, whose opinion I hold in the highest possible regard.
Same thing without being a smart arse and I would need to have a pretty compelling reason to question that opinion.
Mark
 

black_labb

Well-Known Member
Joined
16/2/10
Messages
1,022
Reaction score
121
what if this master brewer had a lisp?
 

Nick JD

Blah Blah Blah
Joined
4/11/08
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
453
Wiktionary has the UK pronounciation as /wəːt/

Since we are not American, I will say it like this.
 

Latest posts

Top