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under priming/carbonation

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Mas

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Made an English IPA OG 1.056 FG 1.016. ABV 5.45%. Used Brewers Friend to calculate priming sugar which resulted in 125 grams DME. Usually I add about 1 and a quarter cups of DME and have found the bottles have been overcarbonated with annoying foam when pouring. So thought I would use priming calculator. I bottled the IPA on 31st December - two weeks ago and the beer is carbonated but very low compared to my other brews. Do I just need to be patient or have I stuffed up. :unsure: Help!
 

bum

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How many volumes did it say that would give you?
 

searly333

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How many litres are you priming?

Have you thought about using dextrose instead of DME?
 

Mas

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bum said:
How many volumes did it say that would give you?
Sorry to sound such a nuff but does that mean Volume of C02 - 2.0.
Have copied and pasted the calculator and details here. Hope you can help new to this caper.



Amount Being Packaged:

17(Liters)

Volumes of CO2:

(see table below)

Temperature at Bottling:

17(C)

Corn Sugar: 72 g
Table Sugar: 68.4 g
DME: 121.8 g
 

yum beer

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Sounds about right for what you are after, 2.0 volumes is lightly carbed and DME I find gives a 'lighter' carb than using dex or sugar.
If you have them 'headmaster' glasses will give you a higher carbonation than normal glasses.
If I have an overcarbed beer I use plain glasses and the nucleated ones for those that are a bit under, its not a huge difference but it helps.
 

Mas

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Virgin Brewer said:
How many litres are you priming?

Have you thought about using dextrose instead of DME?
Have pasted details from priming calculator here. I use organic DME as opposed to the other options but am willing to try if it will give a better result. -I have some health issues and try to keep all my ingredients as organic as possible. The DME has worked no problem on previous 5 batches but has definetely been over carbonated. That annoying foam when you pour the beer. Just a beginner at this caper but passionate and want to learn. Cheers.

Amount Being Packaged: 17(Liters) Volumes of CO2: (see table below) Temperature at Bottling: 17© Corn Sugar: 72 g
Table Sugar: 68.4 g
DME: 121.8 g
 

JDW81

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yum beer said:
If you have them 'headmaster' glasses will give you a higher carbonation than normal glasses.
:icon_offtopic: How does a brand of glass give a better carbonation? Do they have a rough surface, giving more nucleation points for gas to come out of solution or is it their shape?
 

Mas

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yum beer said:
Sounds about right for what you are after, 2.0 volumes is lightly carbed and DME I find gives a 'lighter' carb than using dex or sugar.
If you have them 'headmaster' glasses will give you a higher carbonation than normal glasses.
If I have an overcarbed beer I use plain glasses and the nucleated ones for those that are a bit under, its not a huge difference but it helps.
Thanks mate - will definetely give that a try - maybe increase the volume? These forums are a great help - I hate to admit it but I now realise what "volume" means :unsure: .
 

Truman42

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Mas said:
Amount Being Packaged: 17(Liters) Volumes of CO2: (see table below) Temperature at Bottling: 17(C) Corn Sugar: 72 g
Table Sugar: 68.4 g
DME: 121.8 g
Why do some brewers say its the highest temperature you reached during fermentation but then some calculators say temp at bottling? I often bottle at 4c as my fermenters been pulled out of the CC fridge.
I thought what mattered was the highest temp reached during fermentation and the bottling temperature is irrelveant??
 

bum

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Because explaining all that shit makes the calculator look too complicated. People who brew in fridges are in the minority. Bottling temp is probably close enough for the vast majority of brewers.
 

WarmBeer

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Truman said:
Why do some brewers say its the highest temperature you reached during fermentation but then some calculators say temp at bottling? I often bottle at 4c as my fermenters been pulled out of the CC fridge.
I thought what mattered was the highest temp reached during fermentation and the bottling temperature is irrelveant??
The concentration of CO2 in solution is related to temperature. So, the colder you ferment, the more of the CO2 produced by the yeast remains in the beer.

When you chill your beer prior to bottling, you are increasing the potential for the beer to hold more CO2 in solution, but without a source of CO2 (because your yeasties have done their job, and gone back to sleep), there is no mechanism for injecting more CO2 into the solution.

This is why calculators use the highest temperature you ferment at as the base. Obviously, if you were to start decreasing the temperature of your wort/beer whilst fermentation was still active, you would have that source of new CO2, but the model starts to get very complicated, and dropping temp during fermentation is bad for your yeasts metabolism anyway.

There used to be a good article that the Holy Kitten Strangler wrote a couple of years back, but Articles aren't online at the moment...
 

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