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Two-row?

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Samwise Gamgee

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What does it mean when a grain is described as 2-row and i think i've even read 6-row somewhere too.

Is it suppose to be premium grade grain?
 

Backlane Brewery

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This is fairly big topic, and more complicated than it being premium grain or not.

A quick Google search on "2 row barley" yielded 204,000 results- you can have a look at some of them here.

Most brewing books include a bit of a spiel on the differences, something like this:
Barley grown for brewers malt is called malting barley, as opposed to feed barley, and is divided into two general types; 2-row and 6-row. The most obvious difference between a head of 2-row barley and a head of 6-row barley is the arrangement of the kernels when the head is viewed down its axis. Brewers dont make a big deal about 2-row versus 6-row barley based on the appearance of the barley head, however. The significant differences are found upon closer examination. In general, 6-row malted barley has more protein and enzyme content than 2-row malted barley, is thinner than two-row malt and contains less carbohydrate. There are also flavor differences between 2-row and 6-row and it seems that most brewers feel 2-row malt produces a fuller, maltier flavor and 6-row malt produces a grainier flavor in the finished beer.
 

Asher

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Its all to do with the way the barley is planted.... in other words how the rows are placed in a field... with 2 row(the barley planted in rows of 2), the heads get more sun thus have lower protein levels and spend more energy growin so lower carbohidrate levels too..... when planted in rows of 6 the lack of sunlight makes for increased protein & enzyme levels.....

Well thats what I thought when I started brewing anyway.... :lol: :beer: :lol:

Realy its to do with identifying the two general types of barley. 2-row & 6-row
The most obvious difference between a head of 2-row barley and a head of 6-row barley is the arrangement of the kernels when the head is viewed down its axis.
a good article can be found here:
http://byo.com/mrwizard/872.html

Asher for now
 

MAH

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If buying Aussie, English or European malts, you will get 2-row. 6-row is almost exclusively a US thing (although they also use a lot of 2-row). A fair percentage of the brewing world consider 6-row barley only suitable for livestock feed and would never consider using it for malt.

As you are unlikely ever to get 6-row I wouldn't worry about it.

Cheers
MAH
 

Samwise Gamgee

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Ahh........so its pretty much a fancy name for what malt is already being used in the brewing world.

Thanx fellas! :party:
 

pint of lager

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The other really important point that Asher forgot is that for really optimum performance of the plant, the seed must be planted in the right direction so that the roots go straigh down, and the shoot goes straight up. This means that there is no wasted energy during sprouting and the seed gets the best start.

So really good growers of barley go around and plant each grain the right way up.
 

Asher

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Exactly PoL ... When planted upside down you get de-husked barley...

Asher for now
 

Backlane Brewery

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The only real concern is- what do they do with all the 3, 4 & 5 row barley? :blink:
 

Samwise Gamgee

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Or if you want a top-notch barley, what about single row so it gets maximum sun exposure. Oh how selfish can grain get?? Wanting all the sun to itself :blink:
but if thats what it takes to make great beer then its fine by me!! :beerbang:
 

HumDum

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There's an explanation in this article in Brew Your Own magazine. Everything I've read supports this claim. Mainly 6-row is used to get better starch conversion in the mash if there's a higher percentage of adjuncts or specialty malts in the grain bill.
 

Backlane Brewery

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That BYO article is obviously the definitive word- it's been quoted or linked to by three different people!

Still no word on the fate of all those unwanted 1, 3, 4 & 5 row grains...
 

HumDum

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Sorry, I missed the other references. Have you ever used it? 6-row I mean?
 

PostModern

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am said:
Ahh........so its pretty much a fancy name for what malt is already being used in the brewing world.

Thanx fellas! :party:
[post="46759"][/post]​
How is it "fancy"?? 2-row, describing the alignment of kernels on the stalk. Sounds downright utilitarian to me.

am said:
Or if you want a top-notch barley, what about single row so it gets maximum sun exposure. Oh how selfish can grain get?? Wanting all the sun to itself :blink:
but if thats what it takes to make great beer then its fine by me!! :beerbang:
[post="46785"][/post]​
You realise that the 2-row/6-row has to do with the way the kernels are aligned on the stalk, not with how many rows the farmer plants the field in? They are different strains of grain, just like there are 2-toed and 3-toed sloths.
 

Samwise Gamgee

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How is it "fancy"?? 2-row, describing the alignment of kernels on the stalk. Sounds downright utilitarian to me.
Well instead of saying for example "Lager" to market it better and to make the goods have a premium sounding name they call them "Two-Row Lager" as if it superceeds the "lager" titled product. And thats how it is "Fancy"

Its all to do with the way the barley is planted.... in other words how the rows are placed in a field... with 2 row(the barley planted in rows of 2), the heads get more sun thus have lower protein levels and spend more energy growin so lower carbohidrate levels too..... when planted in rows of 6 the lack of sunlight makes for increased protein & enzyme levels.....
So this is not true then?
 

wee stu

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"Four row barley is still grown and malted in Northern Europe, where it has long been prized for its hardiness in the cold climate. It is not used widely elsewhere because of its steeliness and low yield. It is actually a six row barley that appears to form 4 rows, rather than 6 because of a thin elongated head"

Greg Noonan, New Brewing Lager Beer (1996).

'mazing what you find in books - as for the 1, 3 and 5 rows - I think they are just tthe odd ones out :D
 

PostModern

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am said:
How is it "fancy"?? 2-row, describing the alignment of kernels on the stalk. Sounds downright utilitarian to me.
Well instead of saying for example "Lager" to market it better and to make the goods have a premium sounding name they call them "Two-Row Lager" as if it superceeds the "lager" titled product. And thats how it is "Fancy"

Its all to do with the way the barley is planted.... in other words how the rows are placed in a field... with 2 row(the barley planted in rows of 2), the heads get more sun thus have lower protein levels and spend more energy growin so lower carbohidrate levels too..... when planted in rows of 6 the lack of sunlight makes for increased protein & enzyme levels.....
So this is not true then?
[post="46805"][/post]​
1. Lager is no type of barley I know.
2. I'm pretty sure it's not true. (Sorry Asher).

wee stu said:
as for the 1, 3 and 5 rows - I think they are just tthe odd ones out :D
[post="46807"][/post]​
ROFL.
 

Samwise Gamgee

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I better call MSB and tell them there title on their "Two-Row Lager" Kit is incorrect then!

Since
Lager is no type of barley I know
 

PostModern

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am said:
I better call MSB and tell them there title on their "Two-Row Lager" Kit is incorrect then!

Since
Lager is no type of barley I know
[post="46813"][/post]​
You do that.

2-row is a type of barley, which is used to make malt, which is used to make beer. Whatever the breweries/kit makers name their beer/kit has nothing to do with the fact that 2-row barley is called such because the grains have 2 rows of seeds on the stalk.

Ask a barley farmer how his 2-row lager is growing.
 

Samwise Gamgee

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2-row is a type of barley, which is used to make malt, which is used to make beer. Whatever the breweries/kit makers name their beer/kit has nothing to do with the fact that 2-row barley is called such because the grains have 2 rows of seeds on the stalk
thankyou for clarifying as my original post was to find out what "2-row" meant.

Know any barley farmers? just so i can ask them how their 2-row lager is going?
 

big d

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:D good one pomo 2-row lager. :D
think i will go and have a beer. :beer:

cheers
big d
 

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