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Time to say hello and get more involved

Discussion in 'Welcome!' started by ferretlegs, 13/7/18.

 

  1. ferretlegs

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    Posted 13/7/18
    Hi Everyone,

    Been a long time lurker and I'm not much of a forum participant usually to be honest, but I thought its time to say g'day and get in the thick of it.

    I've been a brewer on and off for about 10 years. First I was a kit man and gave it away after a few years due to disappointing results, but I've recently got back into it after buying a Grainfather and Robobrew to do some proper all grain brewing.

    I've spent the last couple of years learning these machines back to front with pretty much simple SMASH recipes to get a feel for the different grains and hops etc as well. These machines get a pretty good workout and I make a 58L wort about once a fortnight (I combine both machines into one 60L ferm).

    Now here's where I am stuck. I have to be honest and say I am a pretty simple drinker. I like a basic, quaffable lager that I can put away in good amounts. The sort of thing you want to have about 10 of after you finish the lawns on a hot day. Except it doesn't have to be a hot day, nor do I have to have done any work to want to have 10 of them haha - all year round!

    So I have been very happy with making a very very simple lager along the lines of:

    4KG grain, say 50% JW Trad Ale, 50% JW Pils, sometimes I change the ratios around slightly or throw in a small bit of vienna or munich or something.
    1kg table sugar
    60 - 75 min mash @ 65c. Single 60min addition of Superpride for bittering only - to around 22.5 IBU
    Saf 34/70 or S23 in temp controlled environment, 4.8% ABV
    With filtered water, good temp control, gelatin and plenty of time for lagering in the keg in a temp controlled deep freezer I actually end up with an admittedly plain beer, but one I am very happy with. A bit like a carlton draught but more natural, smooth and cleaner tasting. No problems with head retention, clarity etc. Nice and clean.

    The thing is that I want to progress to something with perhaps a bit more character, but I must say I've been to quite a few places selling craft beer on tap and I'm not a fan of hoppy IPA, dark beers, unusual flavours etc. I have very simple tastes. I've done some smashes with other hops and I dont like the flavour of cascade, get sick of fruity citra type hops very quickly and ditto for around the other 4 or 5 hops I've tried.

    So the question is, what is my next evolution of recipe where I can still have a simple, easily smashable beer but perhaps is not quite so 'plain'. Is my selection of JW grains the problem? Or is it I just have a crap palette and there is no hope for me haha.

    I suppose I haven't seen many other people fess up that they only have basic tastes and I wonder if any other people on here are the same and if so what is their goto home recipe.

    Anyway, its great to finally get on board and looking forward to saying hello around the place!
     
    Company of one and Edd Mather 6 like this.
  2. mashmaniac

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    Posted 13/7/18
    Ok so from what your saying, you seem to like a beer with a firm bitterness, no fruity flavours, clean and smooth and quaffable.
    To my mind to expand your horizons your probably looking down the path of more traditional beers, belgian blondes, wheats, Pilsners, helles etc
    Make a trip to a good bottle shop and try a few varieties before settling on a particular style, then research that.

    Hops well there so many and more being released each year but most of these new ones are for late flavour aroma additions.
    You could try
    Magnum (clean bittering additions to 30min)
    Saaz (more a dual purpose hop and can be used quite late)
    Perle (Clean bittering)
    Your not a hop head like some of us, so show some restraint with hop additions beyond 45min, 10 grams of sazz @ 30 mins in an other wise clean beer will have an impact.
    And props to you most would say doing a lager right is one of the hardest to do consistently
     
  3. pnorkle

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    Posted 13/7/18
    I would suggest, rather than making a different style of beer to see if you like it, and potentially having to turf it if you don't, try a few different styles from the local bottle-shop, and then attempt to make beer to a style that you like, and from there go to variations on that theme. A *lot* of mega-swill drinkers (and I'm not accusing you of being one..) find it hard to progress to craft/tasty beers because they're too different to what they're used to. You never know, after experimenting a bit with some ales (not necessarily IPAs) you may develop a taste for something a bit more bold.
     
  4. Moog

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    Posted 13/7/18
    about 10 years ago once I realized that oz actually was starting to develop a taste for REAL beer flavours. (I'm a pom), I'd go to dans, on a Friday, and get 2x 6 packs, of different pale ales, and do that every week, with different one's every time. On friday I'd have 3 of each, and the same again on Saturday.
    It shows you the difference between each but also give your palette time to adapt to each also.
    Too often when people try something new, they spit it out after one sip and say they don't like it, exactly the same as a 5 year old does with new foods.
    Beer flavours take a bit of time to develop in your pallet, but rest assured, if you let yourself take that journey, you'll by glad you did, and would never go back.
     
    scomet likes this.
  5. mashmaniac

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    Posted 13/7/18
    They do say you have to taste something 50 times before you really know if you like it or not, it's the main reason I brew double batches. I mean I have to be sure... right?
     
  6. Edd Mather 6

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    Posted 13/7/18
    How Do Ferretlegs ,
    Welcome to the forum mate, not sure if I've posted it on here , but I've got a few beauts of old beer recipies , ATM , my favourites are Boddingtons Bitter , 1955 and Dutton's (Blackburn, Lancashire) Bitter from 1967 , I'll pop em up if you'd like?
    Cheers
    Edd
     
    Ronwales likes this.
  7. ferretlegs

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    Posted 15/7/18
    Thanks for the suggestions, I think you have summed up my taste in beer pretty accurately. I will definitely try Magnum and Perle as a substitute for bittering and hopefully pick up some subtle changes. While I am doing that I will pick up a few Pilsners, Helles, belgians etc to see which ones I would like to pursue. Do you suggest any particular brands that do these styles well?

    Appreciate the compliment. I do think I have my processes down pat in terms of being able to reproduce the same thing consistently. The only problem is that because I make such large batches I have been reluctant to make big changes to what I now know works for me. It would be heartbreaking to throw away an entire 58L batch after the time and effort required, not to mention the hole it would leave in my stock levels. Cant be running out of my favorite beverage haha.

    Thanks again for your suggestions, it has given me a few new avenues to explore!
     
  8. ferretlegs

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    Posted 15/7/18
    I agree, and I know I need to get out and sample what's available a bit more. I have always been worried though that Dan Murphys etc would all just be different types of mega-swill in the one place so wasn't sure I would get much value. I have made a few different ales and a couple of semi dark beers etc in the past but none of them had that crisp, fizzy, clean lager flavour that I seem to mainly prefer when I feel like downing quite a few in quick succession. I certainly am not against trying different things, I have just found the ones I have tried do not seem to be my cup of tea. Will keep looking though, there must be plenty of beers out there that I could get a taste for!
     
    Ronwales likes this.
  9. ferretlegs

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    Posted 15/7/18
    This seems very sensible to me. I think there has to be a process for fair evaluation here and this seems like a good strategy. Will definitely give this a go. The main problem I've had with new flavours is that after a few glasses, any strong flavours seem to magnify and linger in my mouth. Either too much fruit, or malty beer can quickly become sickly sweet for example. Unfortunately I do like to put a few away in a session and I drink reasonably quickly at the start, so I've found any beer with too much of a flavour profile quickly compounds in my mouth and I don't enjoy drinking it after the 6th glass or whatever. This is never a problem for me with a crisp lager which doesn't seem to get that same compounding flavour magnification / effect.
     
    Edd Mather 6 likes this.
  10. Rocker1986

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    Posted 16/7/18
    A couple of suggestions for pilsners would be Pilsner Urquell and Budejovicky Budvar. You should be able to find one or both at most bottleshops. They don't have the big fruity flavour of pale ale but do have more flavour than standard Aussie lagers. Still clean and crisp. I brew them myself a fair bit along with other styles.
     

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