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TIAB (Trub In A Bag)

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Lyrebird_Cycles

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TIAB

Decided to try wrapping the bottom third of the immersion chiller in voile to see if it would trap some of the trub.

Worked fairly well, I need to tweak a couple of things to get a better whirlpool action. The whole Motueka flowers were a bit too much to ask of it..
 

Bribie G

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That's a lot of slop. What mashing and hop boiling methods do you use?
here's my usual BIAB trub:

trub slow lift.jpg

Full volume BIAB, slow hoist, hops including pellets in a bag "swimming pool"
 

stewy

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That's amazing Bribie!! I need to install a pulley system & try your slow hoist method.
 

Lyrebird_Cycles

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Bribie G said:
What mashing and hop boiling methods do you use?
Continuously stirred open mash in a SS mash tun / kettle, transferred to a separate lauter tun, lauter runnings returned to the mash tun / kettle for a 90 minute open boil with hops added directly. Total kettle hops for this brew were 4 g/l (equal quantities of Motueka, Summer, Saaz and Styrian Goldings)

The "slop" as you call it is a thin layer on the bottom of the whirlpool, there's not as much of it as you seem to assume. I also kettle fine quite heavily (Brewbright at 0.15 g/l) so I don't have to fine later as I'm not set up to use Isinglass and I will not ever use gelatine in beer. Kettle fining at this level usually increases trub volume.

I've never tried BIAB as the efficiencies have always seemed inadequate but I'm intrigued by your trub level. What efficiency do you normally achieve?
 

Bribie G

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A lot of my "trub" used to be hop material but using a grain bag (Not a BIAB bag, different animal) pegged around the top of the urn to make a swimming pool, retains nearly all the spent hops, which are mostly from pellets.
You'd think that the hop pellet material would be like dust and not get trapped by a bag, but after draining I get a good wad of hop sludge from pellets using my particular bags that I get from CB- they are the two foot by two foot ones (archaic I know) that are probably really just paint strainers, but heck they do the job fine.

I wouldn't be surprised if the bag doesn't retain a fair bit of the hot break as well.

Just saw your post LC, yes photos can be very deceptive - the green slime of death.. :ph34r: :ph34r:
The voile would do the job for sure, had you thought, instead of using floppy voile, using a circle of something like the stiff material that these things are made of?

scotchbrite.jpg

I can just see a circle of this stuff (preferably not dyed) cut to exactly fit my urn and pushed down to the bottom at the end of boil......
 

Lyrebird_Cycles

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Since I have a fair amount of polyester wadding (used as damping in speakers) I'll try that. Cheap as chips to buy so if I can't clean it I can just replace it each brew.

I like the swimming pool idea, I'll try that next, seems like it will deal with the whole flowers better too.
 

osprey brewday

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Bribie G said:
That's a lot of slop. What mashing and hop boiling methods do you use?
here's my usual BIAB trub:

trub slow lift.jpg

Full volume BIAB, slow hoist, hops including pellets in a bag "swimming pool"
Does a slow hoist improve the run out of the bag. First I've heard of it, I will give it a go next brew I have been just hoisting it out in one go.
 

Rocker1986

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I'll be using my old BIAB bag that sprung a tiny hole for hop flowers now that I have a new bag. Will just have to make sure it's tied around the urn in a position that it's high enough up above the element, which shouldn't be too hard. That will be waiting a while though, not due to harvest til next year. :p
 

Bribie G

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You lost me there Manticle.
Doing a slow hoist a few cm at a time then tying off for a few minutes lets a grain bed form, but if you yank the bag out quickly a lot of flour and trub gushes out in all directions.
 

Lyrebird_Cycles

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manticle said:
Why do you hate cows so much?
A: It's mostly pigs unless you specifiy "non porcine" (we have customers who insist on this).

B: It's a harsh fining even in wine where the pH is further away from the isoelectric point. We only use it in low grade whites or for sparkles where you have to fine the shit out of them anyway. It's also used for floatation but that's more as a floccing agent for solids than as a fining.

C: We always use it at the juice stage: having to fine a finished wine with jelly is an admission you F'd up the juice prep.

D: In beer the pH is closer to the isoelectric point so it's less effective; I know of no commercial brewery that uses it.

E: Isinglas is far more expensive than jelly but is the fining of choice for beer despite this. You have to ask yourself why only homebrewers use jelly.
 

manticle

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Lyrebird_Cycles said:
A: It's mostly pigs unless you specifiy "non porcine" (we have customers who insist on this).

B: It's a harsh fining even in wine where the pH is further away from the isoelectric point. We only use it in low grade whites or for sparkles where you have to fine the shit out of them anyway. It's also used for floatation but that's more as a floccing agent for solids than as a fining.

C: We always use it at the juice stage: having to fine a finished wine with jelly is an admission you F'd up the juice prep.

D: In beer the pH is closer to the isoelectric point so it's less effective; I know of no commercial brewery that uses it.

E: Isinglas is far more expensive than jelly but is the fining of choice for beer despite this. You have to ask yourself why only homebrewers use jelly.
I prefer time and cold.

BribieG - it was a tongue in cheek reference to a previous comment LC once made about cow's milk, in combination with the above comment about (bovine only) gelatine.
 

timmi9191

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Lyrebird_Cycles said:
I also kettle fine quite heavily (Brewbright at 0.15 g/l) so I don't have to fine later
Are they still making brewbrite? I got stuck with Brewtan-B on my last purchase and was told it had replaced brewbrite
 

bradsbrew

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What's worse, the animal stuff from Gelatine or the PVPP in Brewbrite. Should you filter if using PVPP?
 

sp0rk

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Meh, I've eaten chicken's feet, I'll eat pig derived gelatine
If we're gonna slaughter an animal, might as well not waste anything
 

Lyrebird_Cycles

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bradsbrew said:
What's worse, the animal stuff from Gelatine or the PVPP in Brewbrite. Should you filter if using PVPP?
Normally not necessary, it falls out very effectively because it's insoluble.
 
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