Tasmanian Oak Mash Paddle

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cam89brewer

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I have recently made my own mash paddle and used Tasmanian oak which I purchased from Bunnings. I asked them when buying it whether it has been treated with anything and they didn't have a certain answer and I was just wondering if it is fine to use?
 

Phoney

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Can you make another one and send it to me for analysis? I am a chemical engineer specializing in food safety.
 

cam89brewer

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Mmmm very tempting but this one is customised specifically for my jerking hand :lol:
 

cam89brewer

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I thought I would boil it to see if anything leached out and the water turned a golden brown colour. Is this normal?
 

Dan Pratt

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I used the same wood and have used it for 5-6 brews without any noticeable taste, plus it only goes into the mash for 5 mins.
 

white.grant

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It's a hardwood so won't have been treated with any nasty preservatives, likely its just the tannins and natural oils and such coming out in the boiling water. Mash temps and the short duration you are stirring, shouldn't bother it.

I made my workbench out of tassie oak, beautiful stuff.
 

QldKev

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I thought I would boil it to see if anything leached out and the water turned a golden brown colour. Is this normal?

It is not treated with any chemicals, so from that perspective it should be ok.
http://www.porta.com.au/assets/Uploads/Fil...heet%20TOSL.pdf

All natural woods will leach some tannins if soaked in water. Personally between the tannins possibly being leached and the fear of bad bacterial living in the paddle I would not use any timber in my brew gear. Definitely don't use it once the wort has cooled


QldKev
 

TidalPete

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You can never trust Bunnings or any timber supplier in matters such as this. Cheaper better to make up an aluminium or stainless mash paddle.
Failing that, the above green sponser will supply your needs easy as.
 

QldKev

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You can never trust Bunnings or any timber supplier in matters such as this. Cheaper better to make up an aluminium or stainless mash paddle.
Failing that, the above green sponser will supply your needs easy as.

That's where I got my s/s paddle from, for about $20 can't go wrong.
 

Spoonta

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I also made one out of tas oak its fine after 20 to 30 brews with it
 

cam89brewer

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Mmmm. I am kind of leaning towards finding some stainless steel to put on the end as the paddle.... I really have a lot of trouble trusting the advice of bunnings employees and I suppose you cant go wrong with SS.

Thanks every one for your input.
 

TidalPete

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8\9 years old ATM & will last forever. Also not as dirty as in this old pic. :p
Much less hassle to just buy from the green sponser (no, nil, zip, nada afilliation yadda yadda).
Mash_Paddle_thumb.jpg
 

TasChris

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Tas Oak (there is actually no such tree as Tas Oak, just a vague grouping of eucalypt species...bit of marketing bullshit) is fine, I use a piece of Blackwood and had no problems, I am going to make a Huon Pine mash paddle just to be flash.
Most timbers have mild antibacterial properties and will be fine to use. The color stops coming out of the wood after a couple of uses and is just tannins.
Do your bit to help:
The Tasmanian economy (if you don't you will have to support us with more GST dividends from other states, thanks WA and QLD),
The Forest Industries (we need it due to the lying Greens and sell out Labor governments both Fed and State)
Use a renewable resource with low carbon footprint...unlike Aluminium, Stainless steel, plastic etc.
My continuing employment

I do have a Forest Industry affiliation!!
Cheers
Chris
 

Helles

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It is not treated with any chemicals, so from that perspective it should be ok.
http://www.porta.com.au/assets/Uploads/Fil...heet%20TOSL.pdf

All natural woods will leach some tannins if soaked in water. Personally between the tannins possibly being leached and the fear of bad bacterial living in the paddle I would not use any timber in my brew gear. Definitely don't use it once the wort has cooled


QldKev
I use mine when it is cooled still in the kettle had no problems
 

cam89brewer

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Tas Oak (there is actually no such tree as Tas Oak, just a vague grouping of eucalypt species...bit of marketing bullshit) is fine, I use a piece of Blackwood and had no problems, I am going to make a Huon Pine mash paddle just to be flash.
Most timbers have mild antibacterial properties and will be fine to use. The color stops coming out of the wood after a couple of uses and is just tannins.
Do your bit to help:
The Tasmanian economy (if you don't you will have to support us with more GST dividends from other states, thanks WA and QLD),
The Forest Industries (we need it due to the lying Greens and sell out Labor governments both Fed and State)
Use a renewable resource with low carbon footprint...unlike Aluminium, Stainless steel, plastic etc.
My continuing employment

I do have a Forest Industry affiliation!!
Cheers
Chris
I thought I have made up my mind but you are now swaying me again... :lol: So if I boil it a few times before use and extract some of the tannin and colour it should be fine for use then?
 

Murcluf

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I use a very large (untreated) wooden spoon as a mash paddle and have never had any issues. Also when you consider brewers have used wooden mash paddles for centuries I can't any area for real concern seriously.
 

cam89brewer

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My main concern is to whether it has been treated with anything along the way and find it very hard to know if Bunnings products are safe if they don't know them selves.
 

Franko

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You can never trust Bunnings or any timber supplier in matters such as this. Cheaper better to make up an aluminium or stainless mash paddle.
Failing that, the above green sponser will supply your needs easy as.
Well said brother Pete

Franko
 

white.grant

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How well does it stir the mash?
Stir? , not so much as it weighs about 40 kg (without the vise and stand) so is a little hard to handle, but it has supported the mash tun well in the past.

A wooden mash paddle is just fine, it's biggest advantages are that it won't scratch the tun or conduct heat/cold as easily as a metal paddle. Metal paddles are more sanitary though, and you don't have to worry about isolating it from the boil side.

I love my wooden paddles, they're carved to fit my hand and feel just right.
 

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