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Stc 1000 12v Did I Get The Wrong One?

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Icewind

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i recently bought two of these http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DC-12V-Digital-...=item3ccb581bd3 to fit in a couple of fridges for fermenting. Should I have bought the 220v ones? I might be wrong here, not overly electrically minded, but I thought the fridge still uses its power and the controller controls that via relay switches?

Also, I have a larger fridge i'm going to use as one of my fermenter fridges. 430l upside down westinghouse fridge/freezer. Can I set the freezer part to be controlled by the stc1000 as well as the top part?
 

Markbeer

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The STC-1000 works as an intermediary, cutting the fridge in and out to achieve the desired temperature.

IE the fridge is either turned on or off as if it were plugged directly into the 240v outlet.

So your large fridge will merely just be controlled as a whole. If you put the probe in the fridge part attached to your fermenter it will work to keep your fermenter at the required temp. They both run off the same motor etc.

The freezer may be a completely different temp as air is transferred to the fridge to cool the fridge to the temp set on the controller. The fridge and freezer are linked and apart from fiddling the dials on the fridge you can't control only one and not the other or both separately as the unit is on as a whole or it isn't.

I think you need the 220V version.


i recently bought two of these http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DC-12V-Digital-...=item3ccb581bd3 to fit in a couple of fridges for fermenting. Should I have bought the 220v ones? I might be wrong here, not overly electrically minded, but I thought the fridge still uses its power and the controller controls that via relay switches?

Also, I have a larger fridge i'm going to use as one of my fermenter fridges. 430l upside down westinghouse fridge/freezer. Can I set the freezer part to be controlled by the stc1000 as well as the top part?
 

goid

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i recently bought two of these http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DC-12V-Digital-...=item3ccb581bd3 to fit in a couple of fridges for fermenting. Should I have bought the 220v ones? I might be wrong here, not overly electrically minded, but I thought the fridge still uses its power and the controller controls that via relay switches?

Also, I have a larger fridge i'm going to use as one of my fermenter fridges. 430l upside down westinghouse fridge/freezer. Can I set the freezer part to be controlled by the stc1000 as well as the top part?

Icewind,

You can use the one you bought (12v), you will just need to find a 12v power supply to run it (old PC supply). 220v version is more convenient to wire up due to being able to use the 220v AC for switching the fridge for powering STC.

You can only control the fridge/freezer as a whole, via one compartment's temp.
While the other runs to what ever temp it gets to while fridge/freezer is running.

Goid
 

QldKev

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As Markbeer said most fridge/freezers are linked to a common evaporator and the air is just ducted between the chambers. In this case there isn't a lot you can do without modifying the airflow somehow. Some better fridge/freezers have 2 separate evaporators. Same thing you would need to find out how they work and modify it to allow the fridge to go up to 18c etc. I know our kitchen one dies have separate evaporators, but the display wont allow you to set it anywhere near as warm.

The stc-1000 wiring normally talked about on ahb is just an inline device that throws the entire power from the fridge once the set temp is achieved, same as if you manually flicked the switch at the wall once the fridge was cold enough, then manually switched it back on once it got above the set point.

You should be able to used the stc-1000 version you have, but you will need to use a 12vdc power supply.

Get your electrician to verify this, and then wire it up for you. Obviously you'll also need the temp probe hooked into it's respective slots.
stc_1000_12vdc.jpg
 

Rob S

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I'd spend another $4 or so and get a DC AC Solid State Relay to run this. Separates the 12v from the 240v. IMHO it'd be a safer option to run your fridge this way.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/SSR-25-DA-Solid...#ht_2086wt_1397

It might require a little more wiring, but if you get a bigger jiffy box or tupperware conainer you could neatly put it all inside.
 

glenwal

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I'd spend another $4 or so and get a DC AC Solid State Relay to run this. Separates the 12v from the 240v. IMHO it'd be a safer option to run your fridge this way.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/SSR-25-DA-Solid...#ht_2086wt_1397

It might require a little more wiring, but if you get a bigger jiffy box or tupperware conainer you could neatly put it all inside.
How exactly is it safer? If you just use the STC directly, the 12V and 240V are seperated by a relay anyway. All your adding is another place where he can f up the wiring job.

And then you talk about using a tupperware container as a box? If you're going to talk saftey, then do NOT mount it in a tupperware box. It should be mounted in a 240V rated housing that screws closed (or an earthed metal container, again that screwes closed.)
 

squirt in the turns

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Icewind, whatever you do, don't go and buy a power supply. The STC itself draws so little current ( less than 250mA) that just about any 12V supply will do and you could probably power both units from one supply (wire them in parallel). Even an old phone charger will likely have enough grunt. Search around your house and if you come up short, hit up local AHB members (update your profile with your location).

If you use a computer PSU, remember that the yellow wire is +12, any black wire is ground. If using a power brick type DC supply, check the label to determine the polarity or get a multimeter.
 

squirt in the turns

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How exactly is it safer? If you just use the STC directly, the 12V and 240V are seperated by a relay anyway. All your adding is another place where he can f up the wiring job.

And then you talk about using a tupperware container as a box? If you're going to talk saftey, then do NOT mount it in a tupperware box. It should be mounted in a 240V rated housing that screws closed (or an earthed metal container, again that screwes closed.)
You beat me to it, Glen. I have no idea why Rob S has suggested this...? He's suggesting running 12v through the STC's relay contacts, then hanging the SSR off that? Or bypassing/replacing the internal relay of the STC with the SSR, which isn't that hard - I've just had to replace a relay that failed in one of mine. Didn't use an SSR, though. You only need them in situations where a lot of rapid switching is taking place.

Your point about the safety of the enclosure is well made. I've mounted a couple of mine in gutted computer PSU enclosures and have ensured the case is earthed.
 

Nick JD

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These threads are why people fear wiring the STC1000. To many "electricians" telling each other they're doing it wrong.

QldKev's post is the one to read.
 

Icewind

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These threads are why people fear wiring the STC1000. To many "electricians" telling each other they're doing it wrong.

QldKev's post is the one to read.
thanks guys! I have a friend who is an electrician but won't be available till the weekend. I was really hoping to be able to set a brew down sooner. (Live in Toowoomba. Currently in a bit of a heatwave. 1 week ago it was snowing only a couple hours drive away. Need some temp regulation!)

I have plenty of 12v adapters. I'm leaning more towards a computer psu, as I have one spare, and the decent ones tend to sacrifice themselves before getting to the load.

So this means I will need to house the stc inside a 240v rated box or not?

QLDKev

"As Markbeer said most fridge/freezers are linked to a common evaporator and the air is just ducted between the chambers. In this case there isn't a lot you can do without modifying the airflow somehow. Some better fridge/freezers have 2 separate evaporators. Same thing you would need to find out how they work and modify it to allow the fridge to go up to 18c etc"


Yeh, what I'll be interested to see is it possible to set the base temperature of the freezer part to just above freezing (2 or so degrees) while having the fridge controlled by the stc. Or would that be too inefficient/impossible?
 

QldKev

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thanks guys! I have a friend who is an electrician but won't be available till the weekend. I was really hoping to be able to set a brew down sooner. (Live in Toowoomba. Currently in a bit of a heatwave. 1 week ago it was snowing only a couple hours drive away. Need some temp regulation!)

I have plenty of 12v adapters. I'm leaning more towards a computer psu, as I have one spare, and the decent ones tend to sacrifice themselves before getting to the load.

So this means I will need to house the stc inside a 240v rated box or not?

QLDKev

"As Markbeer said most fridge/freezers are linked to a common evaporator and the air is just ducted between the chambers. In this case there isn't a lot you can do without modifying the airflow somehow. Some better fridge/freezers have 2 separate evaporators. Same thing you would need to find out how they work and modify it to allow the fridge to go up to 18c etc"


Yeh, what I'll be interested to see is it possible to set the base temperature of the freezer part to just above freezing (2 or so degrees) while having the fridge controlled by the stc. Or would that be too inefficient/impossible?
It can be done, but is well beyond what I can offer for assistance over the net. It will depend on a few things.
eg. With my digital fridge with separate evaporators and thermostats it may just be a tweak to the thermostat software, or a replacement of the thermostats including an update to the software.
I think your sparky mate should be able to work it out.

With the question So this means I will need to house the stc inside a 240v rated box or not? I recommend waiting for your electrician mate. A spoiled beer is better than death.
But to answer it YES you must use a decent enclosure.

stc_1000_12vdc_box.JPG


QldKev
 

Icewind

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But to answer it YES you must use a decent enclosure.


I see. Any examples of what you guys have used and where you have procured them from?
 

Rob S

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How exactly is it safer? If you just use the STC directly, the 12V and 240V are seperated by a relay anyway. All your adding is another place where he can f up the wiring job.

And then you talk about using a tupperware container as a box? If you're going to talk saftey, then do NOT mount it in a tupperware box. It should be mounted in a 240V rated housing that screws closed (or an earthed metal container, again that screwes closed.)

You beat me to it, Glen. I have no idea why Rob S has suggested this...? He's suggesting running 12v through the STC's relay contacts, then hanging the SSR off that? Or bypassing/replacing the internal relay of the STC with the SSR, which isn't that hard - I've just had to replace a relay that failed in one of mine. Didn't use an SSR, though. You only need them in situations where a lot of rapid switching is taking place.

Your point about the safety of the enclosure is well made. I've mounted a couple of mine in gutted computer PSU enclosures and have ensured the case is earthed.
My bad I thought it was 12v in and out. Should have read it better.

As for the tupperware - each to their own. I don't see the difference between this and a jiffy box which is recommended in more than one thread, apart from the screw down factor.

FWIW Qld Kev's info is spot on as you say.
 

booargy

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As for the tupperware - each to their own. I don't see the difference between this and a jiffy box which is recommended in more than one thread, apart from the screw down factor.
Somewhere in AS3008 it says that covers shall be only removed with the use of tools.
Get a proper box food containers look shit.
 

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