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Splitting a 20A socket

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sixfignig

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I have a single socket 20A circuit installed in my garage, which is placed conveniently for brewing.

I'd love to be able to use it to power two separate 10A appliances (a 2200w element, and a 2200w element through a Grainfather Controller).

Is it possible to have a qualified sparky knock up a "site powerboard" type of device that will allow me to achieve the above? I preferably don't want to change the physical wall socket as I have other devices I need to use it for.
 

captain crumpet

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so you want something that plugs into your 20a socket, which has 2x 10a sockets?

as long as it only plugs in and isn't permanent wiring, and the cables match the same size as the 20a subcircuit it shouldn't be a problem.
 

Bonenose

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It is possible but it is also pushing the limits of a single circuit.
I am assuming it is a single phase circuit.
 

sixfignig

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so you want something that plugs into your 20a socket, which has 2x 10a sockets?

as long as it only plugs in and isn't permanent wiring, and the cables match the same size as the 20a subcircuit it shouldn't be a problem.
Yes, that's correct.

It is possible but it is also pushing the limits of a single circuit.
I am assuming it is a single phase circuit.
Mind my ignorance but why is it pushing the limits of a single circuit? The total draw would be ~ 4400w through a single 20A socket (which is rated to 4800w @ 240V)
 

Bonenose

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You have any dodgy connections on that circuit and you are going to start melting stuff.
 

n87

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You should be able to plug a 10A plug into a 20A socket, they are designed to be able to do this.
Maybe a long shot, but maybe look for a 20A powerboard... I cant imagine the do exist tho, once you get that high you tend to have dedicated sockets.


Didnt think of if you had round pin 20A, in which case there are things like this: http://www.seltec.com.au/Product-Ca...Output-13-Pin-AUS-20A-Captive-Plug-Input.html

Not going to be cheap tho.
 
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Bonenose

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I have replaced too many melted plugs and outlets etc. over the years. Yes it should work but I would advise some caution.
 

koshari

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What you are seeking can be easily done. Get a sparky to wire up some 10a outlets individually protected with 10a breakers fed from the 20a plug. This way you have effectively maximim demand by limitation. And under no circumstances would you then be able to overload either the 20a plug/socket or either of the 10a ones.

Prolly cost about 100 bucks in parts and an hours labour.
 

azzachaz

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Wouldn't it be simpler to just replace the single GPO outlet with a double? (rated to 20A)
 

Maheel

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Muzzaguzza

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I have replaced too many melted plugs and outlets etc. over the years. Yes it should work but I would advise some caution.
Seriously Bonenose. Best not to say anything if you're not too sure about what you're talking about. A 20 amp outlet is rated at exactly that, 20 amps. Unless the last 35 years of being a sparky, I've been getting it all wrong. The cable is rated at 20 amps along with the outlet and the RCD/MCB.
 

Bonenose

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Seriously Bonenose. Best not to say anything if you're not too sure about what you're talking about. A 20 amp outlet is rated at exactly that, 20 amps. Unless the last 35 years of being a sparky, I've been getting it all wrong. The cable is rated at 20 amps along with the outlet and the RCD/MCB.
That is obviously why I keep replacing melted plugs and outlets on 15 and 20 amp circuits
 

Muzzaguzza

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That is obviously why I keep replacing melted plugs and outlets on 15 and 20 amp circuits
Would it ever occur to you it's not the circuit, but what you're plugging into it? If i plugged in a coat hanger into the active and neutral - would it be the circuit's fault it would trip the breaker or blow up in your face if you had no circuit protection????

My previous statement stands.
 

Bonenose

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Would it ever occur to you it's not the circuit, but what you're plugging into it? If i plugged in a coat hanger into the active and neutral - would it be the circuit's fault it would trip the breaker or blow up in your face if you had no circuit protection????

My previous statement stands.
That was always my point.
 

krz

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<hint>
Usually your oven circuit will be on something like 25A.
Its probably hardwired, but you can buy a plug/socket that is rated 25A, swap it, then run an extension lead top your brew kit.
</hint>
 

azzachaz

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socket that is rated 25A, swap it, then run an extension lead top your brew kit.
This doesn't solve the problem of needing 2 points. Unless you are suggesting a 25A double outlet and running 2 extension leads?
 

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