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Rubes

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Anyone ever done a Scottish Export brew? I am aiming to brew something similar to a Caledonian 80/- From a Protz book (Good Beer Guide) he lists the grain ingredients as Pale malt, Amber, Crystal, Wheat and Chocolate without giving any more specific breakdown. It is hopped with E.K. Goldings and Fuggles.

Given all this I have been playing around trying to get something that seems reasonable. So far I have:

O.G. 1044 20L

4.0KG (84%) JW Traditional Pale malt
0.4KG (8%) TF Amber malt
0.2KG (4%) TF Crystal malt
0.1KG (2%) JW Wheat malt
0.05KG (1%) TF Chocolate malt

20G Goldings (4.5% AAU) @ 60 mins
20G Fuggles (5% AAU) @ 30 mins

Any suggestions? Too much amber?
 

Linz

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Rubes,

check the rec DB


Puched the details into the DB from the "brew you own real ales at home"book and its all over the place/wrong according to the calculator. More fault to the book than the DB
 
J

Jovial_Monk

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From what I remember of the Wheeler Brew English Ales book, that seems about right

Why not go for a real Scots beer, a 90/- of 9% or so?


Jovial Monk
 

Gulf Brewery

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Rubes
The recipe you have is close. The Brew Your Own British Real Ale at Home book says
pipkin pale 3.750kg
amber 475g
crystal 280g
Wheat 240g

but no choc.
70g Fuggles and 30g of golldings at the start of the boil and 10g goldings for 10 minutes. It is supposed to be 35IBU, so check the hops in your program as this book can be miles (kilometers?) out on hop bitterness.

Pedro
 

chiller

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As Pedro has pointed out the hop bitterness levels are often way off in that book.

Scottish is a favourite of mine. With 80% you can increase the malt perception by bring the first runnings to the boil in your kettle for about 15 minutes. Keep the wort moving though and don't let it boil too strongly.

Traditional Scottish beers are primarily malt driven with only a hint of hops.

An 80% is a wonderful beer.

Make sure you use either Wyeast 1728 or WLP 028 Edinburgh as the character of a Scottish beer develops from the yeast.
 

Rubes

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Pedro - Thanks for the recipe. I'll alter the grain to your suggestion. I had guessed that Goldings was the main bittering hop and Fuggles the very limited aroma. I'll swap them over on your advice but I am a bit concerned that 35 IBUs is a little too hoppy for this one. I might bring that back a tad and see how it turns out.

Chiller - Using the WLP 028 as the lhbs only stocks White Labs.

Jovial Monk - I used to love 80/- as a perfect cold weather session beer when I lived in Scotland. My stocks of beer are at a dangerously low level after a break from brewing for several months. Eek! I might be tempted for a Wee Heavy once the stock levels are returned to normal and the sweats have subsided!

Cheers
 

THE DRUNK ARAB

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IIRC, in Greg Noonans Scotch Ale book he recommends a grain bill of pale malt and roast barley, 68C mash temp and 22 IBU for the 80/-.
I can find out grain ratio if you wish but I reckon it was only 60 grams of RB in a 19 litre batch.

C&B
TDA
 

Rubes

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Thanks TDA

Low to mid 20s was what I was aiming for! Also mash at 68oC for a good malty profile.

I think that roast barley is used in McEwans as well as others.
 

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