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Saison Fermentation

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thenymang

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I've just racked a saison from secondary, where it had been for about a month or so. I noticed that the layer on top didn't look anything like the ales I normally brew.

What I saw instead was a hard, thin, milky white layer, which had cracked when i moved the fermenter around. Sort of like thin ice on a lake, if you can picture that.

Anyone have an idea if this is normal for a saison?? Have I done something wrong or got some sort of infection happening?
 

BPH87

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Check the infection thread
 

Blitzer

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I really enjoy infection photos. As it helps me frantically checking my brews believing I see infected lumps everywhere!
 

Nick JD

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Google "lacto infection beer" and click on Images.

Does it look like any of them?
 

Charst

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On the occasions I got an infection it looked like that, I think its acetobacter, taste like vinegar over time,

Doesn't taste like anything in the sours ive tried.
 

thenymang

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Thanks everyone,

Google images is telling me it is likely a lacto infection, as suggested. Sorry, forgot to take a photo of it before I cleaned out the fermenter.

It doesn't taste good at all, but after doing some reading, it seems like I can leave for 6 months and I might have something drinkable.

How much change in flavour can I expect? Is it worth it?
 

Wolfman

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Give it a go and see.

Tried a couple of sour beers at the ANHC and if I had the chance like you, I would keep it for 6 months.
 

thenymang

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Tried a couple of sour beers at the ANHC and if I had the chance like you, I would keep it for 6 months.

Ok will do thanks Wolfman, although the thing is, I've already kegged and carbonated it, thinking that the lacto was actually normal for a saison.

I suppose the carbonation will eventually drop out - have i stuffed it up or will it be fine to keep it around for 6 months?

Should I keep it at room temp for the 6 months, or or in the fridge?
 

Charst

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Thanks everyone,

Google images is telling me it is likely a lacto infection, as suggested. Sorry, forgot to take a photo of it before I cleaned out the fermenter.

It doesn't taste good at all, but after doing some reading, it seems like I can leave for 6 months and I might have something drinkable.

How much change in flavour can I expect? Is it worth it?
Searching acetobacter infected beer gives you similar looking results with the exception that lacto on average looks more like a pellicle with bubbles forming under it. I got an infection in a saison, broken ice as your describing, mildly tart at first, thought I'd leave it in the fermenter at room temp for a few months. Vinegar.
 

Muscovy_333

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Ok will do thanks Wolfman, although the thing is, I've already kegged and carbonated it, thinking that the lacto was actually normal for a saison.

I suppose the carbonation will eventually drop out - have i stuffed it up or will it be fine to keep it around for 6 months?

Should I keep it at room temp for the 6 months, or or in the fridge?

Room temp and keep it carbed.
Id have a taste every month or so. You will know if it is going down hill.
 

thenymang

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Thanks all for the advice, i'll keep it around for now until i know for sure if its gone south
 

tiprya

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When I deliberately innoculated my berliner weisse with lacto it hasn't grown any sort of coating on the surface.

There are lots of types of lacto though, this just may not be a feature of the wyeast lacto.
 
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