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Saison fermentation question

Discussion in 'All Grain Brewing' started by Coalface, 26/11/19.

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  1. Coalface

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    Posted 26/11/19
    Good afternoon all,
    New to AG brewing, currently in the process of fermenting my 3rd batch from the Guten40L.
    I brewed the following recipe up on thursday night then pitched on the friday morning (22/11/19) with WLP568, first few days were at around 23 C and I set the thermostat for 26 C this morning.


    Screenshot_20191126-132854.png

    Screenshot_20191126-132904.png

    My OG was 1054 and I took a sample Monday afternoon (3.5 days fermentation) and got an SG reading of 1014. Beer smith predicted a final OG of 1010 but from reading some forums on saison I'm thinking that the final gravity could be much lower. My fermentation is flying along, and the forum posts seem to suggest 3-4 weeks fermentation for a saison.

    Question is, if I get it below 1010 in the next few days would it be unwise to keg and carb for drinking this weekend, or would there be a benefit of additional fermentation and to let the yeast do some clean up (though from my limited knowledge the POF+ flavours are intentional for this style)?

    thoughts and advice appreciated.

    Cheers

    EDIT: Sorry for the giant screenshots....
     
  2. razz

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    Posted 26/11/19
    It doesn't matter which yeast it is Coalface the rule is simple. You need a constant gravity reading over 2-3 days to ensure the beer has finished. Letting the temp rise to 26 degrees today is a good idea and should get it finished, although at 1.010 I think it is done. I'm not sure on the 3-4 weeks as I don't ferment saisons. Why don't you put a litre in a pet bottle and seal it up and see how it is in a few days and keep the rest in the fv a bit longer.
     
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  3. mongey

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    Posted 26/11/19
    I haven’t used that saison yeast but have tried a fair few. I’ve never had one take longer than 2 weeks,usually done on lesss than 7 . and they always finish way lower than predicted n

    but that’s also an odd recipe. No idea why you would want 8% carapils and 8% Crystal in a saison.
     
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  4. Coalface

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    Posted 26/11/19
    Cheers, that's not a bad idea.
     
  5. Coalface

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    Posted 26/11/19
    Yeah... i did throw it together based on a mix of other beersmith recipes but admittedly there could have been more research put into it. The crystal I had on hand and it was a last minute decision to just chuck that in as well.... fingers crossed it's not too unbalanced.
     
  6. DJR

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    Posted 26/11/19
    wlp565/ dupont / 3724 takes ages to get through the last part of fermenting. Raising the temperature helps, but probably best to just leave it for a week or two at least until you have a stable gravity.

    Edit: you're using wlp568 not 565, but that blend probably has it in there anyway. Hopefully the other ale yeast they put in there helps it finish off
     
    Last edited: 26/11/19
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  7. Coalface

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    Posted 28/11/19
    So it took a couple of days to get up to 26 degrees, but I took an SG reading last night and it was 1009, carbed it up in a 750ml PET and served.
    For me there was probably too much of a soapy taste from the coriander seeds, will go lighter on those next time, though my partner said that was the aspect of it she liked the most.... each to their own.
    Plenty of clove notes in there from the yeast but not as dry or anywhere near tart as I'd hoped - i'm guessing this would be due in part to the unfermentables in the half a kg of crystal I foolishly threw in the mix....
    will give it another week and try again. If it's still a disappointment I might keg it and later on mix it with a bit the next batch I brew, a fruity IPA pitched with reused yeast cake from this batch.
     
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  8. mongey

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    Posted 29/11/19
    Keep it going

    it’s all an opinion but I think they are the best when simple. Pilsner /wheat /Vienna. Ina 70/20/10 , though I do use 5% flaked oats sometimes in my saison.

    things like like ginger orange peel and coriander just arnt needed. Those notes can be gotten from the yeast.

    what temp did you mash at ? 62 or 63 tops is where I like em n
     
  9. Coalface

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    Posted 1/12/19
    Still very new to all grain, haven't played around with mash temps yet, just been doing it all at 65. Though I just cracked open How To Brew by John Palmer this weekend so keen to get a lot more insight from reading that.
     
  10. chthon

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    Posted 2/12/19
    A style note on saisons (and bière de garde, which served the same purpose), they were brewed in winter and kept until harvest. For that, much hops were used, but not all bittering hops: flavor and taste hops, because it used to be a light beer to quench thirst. The beer in itself also probably helped against mineral loss through sweating. Even carbonates are part of the water (stop me if I get too technical :))
     
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