Removing Black Japan

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colonel

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Hi All,
Just wondering if anyone has some ideas for removing Black Japan stain from floorboards?
I've tried

sanding (gets hot, and clogs)

angle grinder with sanding pad (somewhat effective, but still clogs pad, and damages floor)

Metho (no good)

Turps (no good)

Paint stripper (works a bit, but hard to remove from cracks and joins, so will be a problem when re-sealing)

There must be someone out there who has had the same problem?

Cheers.
 

Pennywise

Brewin' Beer for Crazy Clowns & Juggalo's
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Pull them up and use the other side :p
 

hockadays

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We had this, but the guy that sanded them before polishing had no prob with his sander removing it.
 

jel

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you will need something a little more industrial if you want to get it done with minimal frustration and effort (although it is far from the easiest of jobs).

the only way you will remove it is by sanding the affected layer off the boards ...

i hired a drum sander and edger from a local floor polishing business.

looked something like this:
belt sander
edger

4 rooms and a hallway in less than two days, all with black japan stained borders.

hth
j
 

colonel

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I've had some success, using 24 grit paper (lots of it).

But near the wall, where the drum sander won't reach, I'm having to"flick" it off with a sanding pad on an angle driver (very messy).

I'll have earnt a few beers by the finish.




you will need something a little more industrial if you want to get it done with minimal frustration and effort (although it is far from the easiest of jobs).

the only way you will remove it is by sanding the affected layer off the boards ...

i hired a drum sander and edger from a local floor polishing business.

looked something like this:
belt sander
edger

4 rooms and a hallway in less than two days, all with black japan stained borders.

hth
j
 

siiren

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You start by cross cutting the boards on a 45 angle with a drum sander using 24, or 13 grit paper, depending on how bad the boards are.

This will level the boards ready for sanding. This will also get rid of most of the black japan.

On the edges, be prepared to use a lot of discs. Try to get 13g if possible, but no matter what you use, it will clog. Don't bother trying to chip it out, It is a waste of time.

The best method I used was to just rip into the black japan as fast as you can, concentrating on only removing as much paint as possible. It will remove about a few metres of it until it starts to burn & melt.

Then with a new disc start from where the last paper started to clog, and when that paper loses strength, rip up the next few metres etc until the room is finished. Take the extra time to level the boards, it
makes for a better overall finish. You can also buy a disc cutter and reuse your old drum papers. Check ebay or your local sanding supplier.

Rent the machines from the flooring supplier too, they are far better and regularly balanced.

I find that 80g is all that is needed for a final edger sand if the floor is properly levelled, and 100 or 120g for the drum sander.

After the fine drum sand, spray the floor with a garden sprayer full of water, it will raise the deep grain in the timber. re sand to give a super smooth finish, alternatively and most recommended, use a 15in orbital sander with a 150g screen, also used in between coats of finish.

Corners can either be cleaned out with a sharp chisel, or a heavy duty paint scraper.

Most importantly, make sure you punch down ALL nails before you start sanding. Check the edges carefully for tacks and random staples. You can sand over them, but you run the risk of blowing papers.
Re-punch nails after the coarse sand if some have become exposed, and fill holes with putty (preferably agnews water putty tinted with oxides). Sometimes tou may need to re apply the putty before the fine sand.

I was in the business for a number of years before a back injury, but if I can be of any further help, please PM me.

Cheers,

Si
 

colonel

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Thanks, Si.
I pretty well did what you said, the main part of the floor looks good, just the edges to go.

Cheers

You start by cross cutting the boards on a 45 angle with a drum sander using 24, or 13 grit paper, depending on how bad the boards are.

This will level the boards ready for sanding. This will also get rid of most of the black japan.

On the edges, be prepared to use a lot of discs. Try to get 13g if possible, but no matter what you use, it will clog. Don't bother trying to chip it out, It is a waste of time.

The best method I used was to just rip into the black japan as fast as you can, concentrating on only removing as much paint as possible. It will remove about a few metres of it until it starts to burn & melt.

Then with a new disc start from where the last paper started to clog, and when that paper loses strength, rip up the next few metres etc until the room is finished. Take the extra time to level the boards, it
makes for a better overall finish. You can also buy a disc cutter and reuse your old drum papers. Check ebay or your local sanding supplier.

Rent the machines from the flooring supplier too, they are far better and regularly balanced.

I find that 80g is all that is needed for a final edger sand if the floor is properly levelled, and 100 or 120g for the drum sander.

After the fine drum sand, spray the floor with a garden sprayer full of water, it will raise the deep grain in the timber. re sand to give a super smooth finish, alternatively and most recommended, use a 15in orbital sander with a 150g screen, also used in between coats of finish.

Corners can either be cleaned out with a sharp chisel, or a heavy duty paint scraper.

Most importantly, make sure you punch down ALL nails before you start sanding. Check the edges carefully for tacks and random staples. You can sand over them, but you run the risk of blowing papers.
Re-punch nails after the coarse sand if some have become exposed, and fill holes with putty (preferably agnews water putty tinted with oxides). Sometimes tou may need to re apply the putty before the fine sand.

I was in the business for a number of years before a back injury, but if I can be of any further help, please PM me.

Cheers,

Si
 
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