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Reducing foaming during heat

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Muz

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My keezer has been great over winter but not that it's starting to heat up my beers are foaming way too much.
is there a solution to this? It's such a waste of beer when the first pour is pure head.
 

MHB

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If you haven't changed your pouring pressure, the only other variable is the temperature of the beer.
Clean your condenser (the black coil on the back), put a small fan in the fridge (helps to keep the temperature even thought, otherwise there can be up to 5oC between the top and bottom), turn the thermostat down.
Hope like hell that the fridge is not dying...
Mark
 
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If you haven't changed your pouring pressure, the only other variable is the temperature of the beer.
Clean your condenser (the black coil on the back), put a small fan in the fridge (helps to keep the temperature even thought, otherwise there can be up to 5oC between the top and bottom), turn the thermostat down.
Hope like hell that the fridge is not dying...
Mark
Do you have a fan that sends cold air up the font tower?, that would be your first beer!
 

Muz

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So my Keezer is just a timber collar on an old freezer. I'm pretty confident the temp is at 7 degrees as it's controlled by an inkbird and has a fan to circulate the air.

I was thinking it was because tap was warmer in the warmer weather. The Keezer is in my garage which was at 32 degrees yesterday. Could also be the glass temp I guess.
 

JDB

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So my Keezer is just a timber collar on an old freezer. I'm pretty confident the temp is at 7 degrees as it's controlled by an inkbird and has a fan to circulate the air.

I was thinking it was because tap was warmer in the warmer weather. The Keezer is in my garage which was at 32 degrees yesterday. Could also be the glass temp I guess.
Same setup as mine, it's just that the taps are warm now, so first pour is going to foam. You can pour a little bit to cool the taps, toss the foam then pour a full glass. I have flow control taps, so start of super slow flow rate and speed up as the taps cool, works well without having to toss precious beer.
 

Muz

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Yeah, keeping the glass in the keezer sounds like a good idea. Might try that. Just trying to think of a way to keep the tap itself cool. Maybe if the shank was bigger it would cool the tap?
 

theSeekerr

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Yeah, keeping the glass in the keezer sounds like a good idea. Might try that. Just trying to think of a way to keep the tap itself cool. Maybe if the shank was bigger it would cool the tap?
Yeah, having the fan blow across the shanks can help, too.
 

MHB

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Some sort of insulation around the tap(s) could help. Hang a tea towel over the tap or even wrap it around the tap.
I think one of my books on foam says the glass should be 2oC colder than the beer, but never frozen. Frozen glasses have lots of micro ice crystals in them and they cause the first bit of beer to foam even more.
Mark
 
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zoigl

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After I finish my last glass for the night, I blow out my beer line with star san ( or local equivalent) dispensed from a 9 litre keg connected to a soda stream bottle. Next time I pour a glass from my tower, I collect the star san to chuck out, and this seems to help bring my lines down to serving temperature. Leaving the star san in the beer line seems to prevent bad stuff happening in my lines as well.
 

peterlonz

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Good god, what a palaver.
I don;t use Star San on anything, but concede I would if I encountered any problems indicating it's use.
The only thing I do after the last glass is thoroughly rinse out any bottles (I mostly use Kegs) two cold rinses then a hot rinse direct from our hot tap which is around 70 deg.
My bottles then get sun dried capped & stored.
Even pubs only clean lines about once per week.
 

Tony M

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I find flushing my lines at beer o'clock with mild alcohol solution works just as well. There was a problem with mould in my taps until I made up these little booties. They keep the cockies and their shit out.
IMG_0860.jpg
 

zoigl

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Good god, what a palaver.
I don;t use Star San on anything, but concede I would if I encountered any problems indicating it's use.
The only thing I do after the last glass is thoroughly rinse out any bottles (I mostly use Kegs) two cold rinses then a hot rinse direct from our hot tap which is around 70 deg.
My bottles then get sun dried capped & stored.
Even pubs only clean lines about once per week.
I guess that, as I do not drink from my keg everyday, my star san process allows me more time between total cleaning of my lines and taps.
 

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