Recipe mix up, Coopers kits

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Thzxykraq

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Hi Guys,

Just wanted your opinion. I was making the Cog Work IPA from Coopers
  • 1 × Thomas Coopers Bootmaker Pale Ale (1.7kg)
  • 1 × Thomas Coopers Amber Malt Extract (1.5kg)
  • 1 × Light Dry Malt (500g)
  • 2 × Light Crystal Malt (100g)
  • 1 × Centennial Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Citra Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Simcoe Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Carbonation Drops (250g)
But due to a mix up I bought 250g Carapils Malt from The Voyager IIPA recipe instead of the Light Crystal, and hot stepped it according to the Voyager recipe for 30 mins before I noticed. I ended up just using the rest of the recipe for the Cog Work, and dumped in about 500g of Dextrose as the SG was only in the 1.40s to get a SG of 1.57. So fermenting went ok using the Coopers FV, FG is stable at 1.10 but the brew is very very cloudy after a week. I'm assuming that's because I hot steeped and didnt cold break fast enough (no wort chiller)? or should I leave it a few more days

That being said still tastes ok, but just wondering if there are any ideas for cleaning it out a bit, or should it clear up in bottle once its cold. I dont have access to a big enough fridge to cold crash?
 
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Hi Guys,

Just wanted your opinion. I was making the Cog Work IPA from Coopers
  • 1 × Thomas Coopers Bootmaker Pale Ale (1.7kg)
  • 1 × Thomas Coopers Amber Malt Extract (1.5kg)
  • 1 × Light Dry Malt (500g)
  • 2 × Light Crystal Malt (100g)
  • 1 × Centennial Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Citra Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Simcoe Hops (25g)
  • 1 × Carbonation Drops (250g)
But due to a mix up I bought 250g Carapils Malt from The Voyager IIPA recipe instead of the Light Crystal, and hot stepped it according to the Voyager recipe for 30 mins before I noticed. I ended up just using the rest of the recipe for the Cog Work, and dumped in about 500g of Dextrose as the SG was only in the 1.40s to get a SG of 1.57. So fermenting went ok using the Coopers FV, FG is stable at 1.10 but the brew is very very cloudy after a week. I'm assuming that's because I hot steeped and didnt cold break fast enough (no wort chiller)? or should I leave it a few more days

That being said still tastes ok, but just wondering if there are any ideas for cleaning it out a bit, or should it clear up in bottle once its cold. I dont have access to a big enough fridge to cold crash?
Very likely it will clear at least partly. The scary alternative is infection, but you'd probably already pick that up in the taste. I suspect starch haze is your problem. If so, drink the beer young.

By light dry malt, surely you mean DME, not grain? Light dry malt requires mashing. Steeping it would give you a load of unconverted starch in your wort and beer

Otherwise, carapils may have added unconverted starch . Depending on the maltster, carapils may or may not require mashing. Who made yours?

Some friendly recommendations on posting recipes for troubleshooting, aimed at anyone, not just Thzx. Always include volume of wort, the yeast, mashming vs steeping where relevant, andpitching and fermentation temperatures. Volume and yeast may be evident from the name of the recipe, but only to those familiar with Coopers recipes. For AG brewers, more is often needed.

Does Coopers post recipes in that odd 1 x, 2 x format? Most posters just give the weight in grams (pounds where I come from), or list LME in cans.
 
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BrewLizard

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By light dry malt, surely you mean DME, not grain? Light dry malt requires mashing. Steeping it would give you a load of unconverted starch in your wort and beer
OP's wording is verbatim from the recipe and how Coopers names their product: "Light Dry Malt" with "extract" implied. I've never seen grain referred to as "dry malt" -- is this a thing?

And yep, ingredients are itemised like a shopping list. No leftovers. :)
 
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OP's wording is verbatim from the recipe and how Coopers names their product: "Light Dry Malt" with "extract" implied. I've never seen grain referred to as "dry malt" -- is this a thing?

And yep, ingredients are itemised like a shopping list. No leftovers. :)
'Dry malt' is not a thing, but from time to time odd descriptions turn up on posted recipes, I'm not familar with Coopers recipes and so I checked.. In any event the carapils is a possible source of starch haze. Who made it? For example, Weyermann says the starch in theirs has been converted and the malt can be steeped. Briess recommends mashing. 'Carapils,' if I recall correctly, has been the subject of some trade name disputes.
 
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JDW81

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Just looked at the Briess website, they say carapils can either be mashed or steeped. Every dextrin malt/carapils I've used in the past has been suitable for steeping only (have checked the manufacturers website for each prior).

JD
 
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Just looked at the Briess website, they say carapils can either be mashed or steeped. Every dextrin malt/carapils I've used in the past has been suitable for steeping only (have checked the manufacturers website for each prior).

JD
I stand corrected on Briess, and thanks. On further probing I find that some sources recommend mashing Weyermann's carapils, respecially in large proportions of grist: Carapils: The Most Misunderstood Malt.

Thyz, who was the maltster? If you have tincture of iodine, iodophor sanitiser or Betadine on hand, add a little to a sample of the beer in question. If unconverted starch is present, you'll get an instant change to purple or purplish black.

Did the manufacturers say suitable for steeping or steeping only? I don't know of any malts that are for steeping only, except that some home brewers like to add heavily roasted malts at the end of a mash. Otherwise, caramel and dextrin malts are common in the mash grists of recipes. Palmer gives lower yields from steeping than from mashing for those malts: Table of Typical Malt Yields - How to Brew
 
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