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Rather Gassy Beer

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andreic

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Hi all,

I recently brewed a Brewcraft Dutch lager with 1kg light dry malt and used the saflager S-23 yeast. After 1 week in primary, 2 in secondary, I bulk-primed my 23L batch with 170g dextrose. 6 weeks down the track, it tastes OK, but is very gassy - the bubbles have the consistency of a drink of coke. The SG before bulk-priming was 1.010.

My 2 previous brews with the saflager s-23 were ridiculously over-carbonated after 2-3 months, but I had previously put this down to bottling too early, and possibly using too much priming sugar (these were pre bulk-priming for me).

The bubbles really look and feel like "coke" bubbles rather than what I would expect from a beer. Is this some peculiarity with the S-23 yeast? or is it just a simple matter of cutting down the priming dextrose next time?

cheers
 

Bilph

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Can't help with the yeast, because I've never used it, but when bottling in winter the temperature of the brew at bottling may be an issue.
Colder beer retains more CO2 in solution, which can result in a gassy beer after bottling. Any idea of the temp at bottling? It starts to become an issue around 14C and below.
Of course, the other possibility, dread the thought, is infection. I presume it tastes okay?
 

andreic

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Bilph said:
Can't help with the yeast, because I've never used it, but when bottling in winter the temperature of the brew at bottling may be an issue.
Colder beer retains more CO2 in solution, which can result in a gassy beer after bottling. Any idea of the temp at bottling? It starts to become an issue around 14C and below.
Of course, the other possibility, dread the thought, is infection. I presume it tastes okay?
[post="78902"][/post]​
Thanks for the reply.

OK, bottling in winter could be an issue then - these brews were all fermented (and bottled) around 12C (give or take 1 or 2 degrees). They taste OK - pretty confident there is no infection.

I'm onto ales now - doing a coopers sparkling with a recultured yeast. I guess at around 18-20C the same problem should not occur (if temperature wass indeed the issue).
 

Bilph

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You may want to give this a bit of a read...

Primer on Priming

The upshot is that at 12C you need to back off your priming sugar by about 1g per litre compared with bottling at 20C.

:beer:
 

bottlerocket

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was the final quantity 23L?

after i rack to secondary and then to bottling bucket my 23L brews end up more like 21L
so less sugar is needed to prime
just a thought :D
 

andreic

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bottlerocket said:
was the final quantity 23L?

after i rack to secondary and then to bottling bucket my 23L brews end up more like 21L
so less sugar is needed to prime
just a thought :D
[post="79146"][/post]​
Yes, the final quantity may have been closer to 21L. This may have also had an impact. I will have another look at some of the bulk priming threads before bottling my next batch.

cheers
 

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