Quantcast

Priming Sugar Levels

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

Fish

Well-Known Member
Joined
4/5/04
Messages
105
Reaction score
0
Can someone please confirm the carbonation levels I am putting into promash to calculate my priming sugar. I have invested a lot of love into my last couple of beers (one being my first AG) and would hate to muck it up at the final hurdle.

Wheat beer: Volume of CO2 = 4 (went for roughly the middle of John Palmer's range)

Maibock: Volume of CO2 = 2.5 (went for roughly the middle of John Palmer's range for Eurpoean lagers)

Thanks
Fish
 

Fish

Well-Known Member
Joined
4/5/04
Messages
105
Reaction score
0
One other point I forgot to clarify.

Promash asks for 'Temperature of beer during fermentation'. This is quite specific but can someone just confirm that with a lager that fermented at 10C and has subsequently been in the fridge for a month or two at 2C, the information Promash requires is still 10C.

Thanks again.
Fish
 

Brew Master

New Member
Joined
5/8/04
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
I found a couple of good sites on Bulk Priming.

See here
BUlk1
bulk 2

From what I can teel you use the highest temperature after fermenting has finished. Which in your case is 10c, if you haven't had a diacetyl rest.
 

GMK

BrewInn Barossa:~ Home to GMKenterprises ~
Joined
18/12/02
Messages
3,699
Reaction score
11
Fish - you should use the 2 degrees for the promash calcs on priming.
 

Fish

Well-Known Member
Joined
4/5/04
Messages
105
Reaction score
0
Thanks to Brew Master and GMK for the links / advise.

If anyone is interested the Craftbrewer link discusses the following re. lagered beers:

"Do they use the fermentation temperature or the lagering temperature? Still others will take their lager through a 18-20 C diacetyl rest before lagering, introducing three quite different temperature rests. What value should they use?

Considering that less CO2 can be held in the beer at higher temperature, the short answer is to use the highest temperature the beer has been at since the end of fermentation, since we expect the CO2 level to come to a new equilibrium if rested at a higher temperature. Dropping the temperature in the absence of active CO2 production is not going to cause any significant re-dissolution of CO2 into the beer. There may of course be some fermentation during lagering, the extent of which will depend on the completeness of fermentation prior to lagering, including the amount of dextrins in the original wort. Before and after lagering gravity readings could assist to this extent. If you can detect a point or two drop in gravity, then the lagering temperature may best represent the correct value to determine the CO2 level in the green beer".

Fish
 

Latest posts

Top