Pressure Fermenting Question

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Brad2027

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Hey Guys,

Need a little advise, plan on doing an Ale today, using US05.

First time using the new pressure fermenter (Apollo stub nose 30L), my main question is after yeast starter is pitched should i leave pressure relief valve open for the first 24hrs or so to allow for start of fermentation before setting spundy to 10psi?
Or 10PSI from yeast pitch?

Cheers
 

wide eyed and legless

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Hey Guys,

Need a little advise, plan on doing an Ale today, using US05.

First time using the new pressure fermenter (Apollo stub nose 30L), my main question is after yeast starter is pitched should i leave pressure relief valve open for the first 24hrs or so to allow for start of fermentation before setting spundy to 10psi?
Or 10PSI from yeast pitch?

Cheers
Leave it as long as possible until almost finished before capping, the reason spunding fermentation is used is to get some carbonation into the finished beer.

 

Newkid

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I leave mine off the valve for the first 24 hours then connect it to the valve never had any problems
I set my valve to my serving pressure 15psi
 

fifis101

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I've always just set my spund and put it on when I pitch the yeast. I'd be keen to hear the reasoning why people would delay it.
I also pressure ferment a lot higher than most. I ferment at 20-25psi, so the beer is completely self carbonated. At those pressures, once cold crashed the pressure drops down to around 10-15psi and ready to be transferred and drink straight away.
 

wide eyed and legless

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I leave mine off the valve for the first 24 hours then connect it to the valve never had any problems
I set my valve to my serving pressure 15psi
I've always just set my spund and put it on when I pitch the yeast. I'd be keen to hear the reasoning why people would delay it.
I also pressure ferment a lot higher than most. I ferment at 20-25psi, so the beer is completely self carbonated. At those pressures, once cold crashed the pressure drops down to around 10-15psi and ready to be transferred and drink straight away.
All depends on what you are trying to achieve. A beer, or an award winning beer. If its just beer then go ahead. I don't see Gordon Strong, Dave Miller and a myriad of others who contribute articles on home brew lauding the benefits of pressure fermenting.
Believe me pressure fermenting has come from the land where 12% of the people believe Joan of Arc was Noahs wife.
If it was so good why aren't craft or commercial breweries applying pressure from the off set instead of the end of fermentation?
Time to get a grip and stop being so gullible.
 

MHB

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All the research done on pressure fermentation was done on Lager beer, it was found that you could knock 7 days out of a 21 day Lager brewing cycle. The early tests on Ale made beer with so many faults it was dropped immediately, with Lager there were some faults (like increased Acetaldehyde, damage to yeast...). On the whole not many brewers took it up and they are all producers of low cost fast turnaround mass market beers (fizzy yellow piss).

Even with Lager brewing the changes in the Sulphur containing fermentation products have to be managed very carefully (see Struck Match).
Nice to be agreeing with WEAL again, not something I would be investing in without giving the whole process a lot of thought.

Note we aren’t talking about "Bunging" or using the ferment to make a fair fraction of the fizz by closing the fermenter late in the brew (Braukaiser covers the maths really well if you are interested). Closed fermentation could have some real advantages if you are trying for very low dissolved Oxygen in highly hopped beers or where O2 is doing other serious harm. Whole different conversation.
Mark
 

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