Pasteurisation

Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum

Help Support Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum:

Jazzafish

Well-Known Member
Joined
19/7/05
Messages
974
Reaction score
17
From http://www.microbrewer.info/brewing_process.htm

Most (but not all) Australian commercial beers are heat-pasteurised after filtration. Pasteurisation is a process of sterilisation by rapid heating and cooling. It kills off live bacteria (beer spoilage organisms) and yeast cells to prevent the beer from being spoiled by them. Bulk beer is pasteurised before it is transferred into the kegs, but packaged beer is pasteurised after it has been bottled or canned.

Pasteurisation gives the beer a much longer shelf-life but does have some effect on its taste. In Australia it is not a controversial process, but in the USA draught (keg) beer is by law not pasteurised, and in the UK beer which has been pasteurised cannot be called 'real ale'.

CO2 is added to the beer after filtration and pastrurisation, replacing the natural 'sparkle' lost in the process.

Does anyone do this to their home brew?
Has anyone tried it?

It just doesn't seem like something I'd want to do to my beer
 

berapnopod

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/1/05
Messages
374
Reaction score
1
Jazzafish said:
Does anyone do this to their home brew?
Has anyone tried it?

It just doesn't seem like something I'd want to do to my beer
[post="92353"][/post]​

See my post on the "Boiling Home Brew" subject.

I think for home brewers its not such a good idea anyway. Since we leave the yeast in the bottle, this works well to keep the beer's shelf life long. Because the big boys filter their beers, there's no yeast left to preserve the beer and therefore they have to pasteurise.

Defeats the purpose if you pasteurise a beer with yeast in it.

Berp.
 

T.D.

Hop Whore
Joined
28/4/05
Messages
2,214
Reaction score
1
berapnopod said:
Since we leave the yeast in the bottle, this works well to keep the beer's shelf life long.
[post="92462"][/post]​

Yeah, that's something I found a bit confusing about the original info posted by Jazza - I always thought that "technically" home brew, being naturally carbonated and conditioned, would last much longer than pasturised megaswill. Personally I think home brew is best between 1 and 4 months from bottling, but that is just my opinion (and also depends on the time of year, yeast, and the style you are dealing with).
 
Top