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Mild Ale Malt

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Beer Krout

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I've been looking at some recipes in the inspirational Radical Brewing by the Randy Mosher.

I was keen to have a go at his "Old Nut Case Brown Ale" but unsure of how to get my hands on Mild Ale Malt.

Mosher's description:
Darker color, sweeter, nuttier taste than pale ale malt.

I don't think it's available in Oz.
Is there a good substitute for this kind of malt?
Or can I make it myself with some Maris Otter and an Oven?

Brett
 

Beer Krout

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The recipe contains:

Mild Malt 65%
Amber/Biscuit Malt 31%
Brown Malt 4%

Apparently Mild Malt is similar in colour to Light Munich.

Brett
 

PostModern

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I've made a couple of Milds with JW Light Munich. I haven't tasted any cask Milds to make a comparison, but they were tasty beers nonetheless.
 

locost

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Randy Mosher suggests that light munich and vienna make good mild ale malt substitutes.

I suspect that since JW's Ale Malt is kilnerd a little darker than your standard British pale malt, it might make a good substitue too.
 

razz

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From "The complete handbook of homebrewing" by Dave Miller. "Mild ale malt is kilned a little higher than pale ale malt and will give a golden to amber coloured wort." :D
 

warrenlw63

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The funny part is in the Classic Styles Book "Mild Ale" David Sutula the author claims that no Mild Brewer in the UK had even heard of "Mild Ale Malt". :blink:

The conculsion being that the malsters made this product purely for the US Micro Scene. :lol:

What next? Brown Ale Malt, Altbier Malt... What about Trappist Ale malt? :ph34r:

Warren -
 

ausdb

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The funny part is in the Classic Styles Book "Mild Ale" David Sutula the author claims that no Mild Brewer in the UK had even heard of "Mild Ale Malt". :blink:

The conculsion being that the malsters made this product purely for the US Micro Scene. :lol:

What next? Brown Ale Malt, Altbier Malt... What about Trappist Ale malt? :ph34r:

Warren -
Dave Lines "Big book of brewing" (1st ed 1985) refers to it, and to quote:
"Mild ale malt is malted barley roasted slightly more than Pale malt. The higher kilning temperature tends to give a fuller flavoured beer and results in a darker coloured malt with a slightly restricted diastatic activity."
So its not all fantasy.

FWIW I use a mix of maris otter 2/3 and munich 1/3 as for whatever base malt is called for in my milds and find it works well.
 

warrenlw63

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From what I can gather Paul's are the only malsters who supply it. Here's the blurb. Produces extra dextrins. Sounds like Schooner Malt. :lol:

Best mild ale:
Mild ale malts are often made from two-row winter malting barleys. Standard mild ale malt typically has nitrogen levels below 1.65% (10.3% protein), and best mild ale malt has levels below 1.6% (10% protein). The grain is steeped to 45% moisture and germinated cool to produce a well-modified malt. Kilning starts at 140 F (60 C) and rises to 212-221 F (100-105 C) to encourage color formation. The kilning process produces a wort with a higher dextrin content than that of pale ale malt, resulting in a sweet beer regardless of whether it is mild ale or the bottled version, brown ale. Suitable for infusion mashing using top-fermenting yeast. Odor of mash: normal. Degree of clarity: clear. Rate of filtration: normal.

Warren -
 

Stuster

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resulting in a sweet beer regardless of whether it is mild ale or the bottled version, brown ale.
:unsure:

Good to see these maltsters know what is happening with what they make. :lol:

Edit: My LHBS was talking recently about stout malt. Apparently this is available and is a base malt that is malted slightly more darkly than normal pale malt. Sounds like it could be a possibility. Not sure about availability.
 

jayse

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The recipe contains:

Mild Malt 65%
Amber/Biscuit Malt 31%
Brown Malt 4%

Apparently Mild Malt is similar in colour to Light Munich.

Brett
Mild ale malt would be closer to JWM trad than the light munich. I would certainly go the trad ale myself. As is that looks over the top in the terms of amber malt aswell i'd maybe look at swapping some of the amber malt for munich and keeping the mild malt as trad ale. I'd also look at using a small bit of choc malt instead of the brown malt for colour. Wait a mintue now I'am completely ripping the recipe to shreds :eek: oh well just my couple bobs worths.

Boozed broozed and broken boned.
Jayse
 

Peter Wadey

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resulting in a sweet beer regardless of whether it is mild ale or the bottled version, brown ale.
:unsure:

Good to see these maltsters know what is happening with what they make. :lol:

Edit: My LHBS was talking recently about stout malt. Apparently this is available and is a base malt that is malted slightly more darkly than normal pale malt. Sounds like it could be a possibility. Not sure about availability.
Hi Stuster,

I believe the maltsters use of the terminology 'Mild' & 'Brown Ale' to be correct.
Just so you know what to label them next time you keg+bottle from the same batch :)

Peter
 

MAH

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OK if we are now picking the recipe apart, this is one I've made quite successfully a number of times.

85% ale malt
5% brown malt
5% chocolate male
5% crystal malt

OG 1.035 to 1.038, 20 IBU's, using Fuggle for bittering and then 1gm per litre of Fuggle at flame out.

Use your favourite full flavoured ale yeast and ferment at the top of it's range to get as much complexity as possible. Recently I've just been using S33.

Cheers
MAH
 

warrenlw63

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The recipe contains:

Mild Malt 65%
Amber/Biscuit Malt 31%
Brown Malt 4%
Warren

What do you think of this much Amber malt?
Not over the top is it? :p
TOOOOOOO Much. :eek:

Even using 10% will give an overwhelming character. I've used 5% in a Porter and could still detect it even with Choc and Brown Malt in the bill. Maybe if you want a big hit of the stuff go 10% Amber and the 20%(ish) replace with some Munich. :)

Please don't use 30% though... You'll be sorry. ;)

Note: This is under the assumption you're using Baird's Amber.

Warren -
 

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