Messing around with brewfather wondering if ways to increase FG

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Trying to make a Irish red and brewfather is predicting the FG to be about 1.009 I want more gravity so I choose more dextrose profile for mash but for the life of me I can't raise the FG without adding Maltodextrose which I don't want to do. I'm new to AG and just messing around I know this is only a prediction but can someone advise me about what I can add to get a higher final gravity ( I don't know my efficacy yet I'm just messing around so I'm trying to learn). Any help and advice is much appreciated, anyways here's my recipe
Screenshot_20220421-213804.png Screenshot_20220421-213752.png Screenshot_20220421-213737.png Screenshot_20220421-213726.png
 

MHB

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Ok you have a bit to learn.
First just because someone publishes a recipe doesent mean its a good one. In this case Irish Red is usually an Ale, your recipe uses a lager yeast with an 84.4% apparent attenuation (improbable). Other choices will give an higher FG and need changes to your fermentation profile.
Adjusting your mash temperature, and choosing some Vienna or Munich malt will up the FG and the body of the beer.

There is a pretty good writeup on Brisbane water chemistry on the BABS site, might be worth a read, pay attention to your Carbonate, its in the form of Bi-Carbonate. Generally regarded as tempoary hardness, with whats there I doubt you will hit ideal mash pH, a bit of Lactic or Phosphoric and some way to measure your pH accuratly might be worth while.

As a starting out brewer I would recomend you make the same 1 Malt 1Hop addition beer a couple or three times in a row(something like Coopers Pale Ale). You will learn heaps if you pay attention and keep notes. A brewer makes beer not software, you need a bit of a knowledge base and a skill set, it will take time to develop.
Might be worth hooking up with the guys at BABS, they sound a pretty enthuastic bunch and are often happy to share.
Mark
 
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Ok you have a bit to learn.
First just because someone publishes a recipe doesent mean its a good one. In this case Irish Red is usually an Ale, your recipe uses a lager yeast with an 84.4% apparent attenuation (improbable). Other choices will give an higher FG and need changes to your fermentation profile.
Adjusting your mash temperature, and choosing some Vienna or Munich malt will up the FG and the body of the beer.

There is a pretty good writeup on Brisbane water chemistry on the BABS site, might be worth a read, pay attention to your Carbonate, its in the form of Bi-Carbonate. Generally regarded as tempoary hardness, with whats there I doubt you will hit ideal mash pH, a bit of Lactic or Phosphoric and some way to measure your pH accuratly might be worth while.

As a starting out brewer I would recomend you make the same 1 Malt 1Hop addition beer a couple or three times in a row(something like Coopers Pale Ale). You will learn heaps if you pay attention and keep notes. A brewer makes beer not software, you need a bit of a knowledge base and a skill set, it will take time to develop.
Might be worth hooking up with the guys at BABS, they sound a pretty enthuastic bunch and are often happy to share.
Mark
I left phosphoric acid and lactic acid out because it's a bit hard to source atm I'm trying to use a little calcium chloride insitu, I have a pH meter and am going to practice with ph
 
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Ok you have a bit to learn.
First just because someone publishes a recipe doesent mean its a good one. In this case Irish Red is usually an Ale, your recipe uses a lager yeast with an 84.4% apparent attenuation (improbable). Other choices will give an higher FG and need changes to your fermentation profile.
Adjusting your mash temperature, and choosing some Vienna or Munich malt will up the FG and the body of the beer.

There is a pretty good writeup on Brisbane water chemistry on the BABS site, might be worth a read, pay attention to your Carbonate, its in the form of Bi-Carbonate. Generally regarded as tempoary hardness, with whats there I doubt you will hit ideal mash pH, a bit of Lactic or Phosphoric and some way to measure your pH accuratly might be worth while.

As a starting out brewer I would recomend you make the same 1 Malt 1Hop addition beer a couple or three times in a row(something like Coopers Pale Ale). You will learn heaps if you pay attention and keep notes. A brewer makes beer not software, you need a bit of a knowledge base and a skill set, it will take time to develop.
Might be worth hooking up with the guys at BABS, they sound a pretty enthuastic bunch and are often happy to share.
Mark
That's not a real recipe it's me messing around I'm just trying to learn I'm not going to make this
 

MHB

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The way the chemistry works means that you cant get low enough with just salts, you will need acid, I think my local has it in stock so if you cant get it try Brewman.
If I might suggest trying some well established recipes and getting the basics right first, before you head off on your own. Study up on a style and go for a simple recipe first. Good start if you want to make an Irish Red. Personally I like the one in Grahams Wheelers book. This one from the Almanac is pretty sound to.
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Mark
 
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The way the chemistry works means that you cant get low enough with just salts, you will need acid, I think my local has it in stock so if you cant get it try Brewman.
If I might suggest trying some well established recipes and getting the basics right first, before you head off on your own. Study up on a style and go for a simple recipe first. Good start if you want to make an Irish Red. Personally I like the one in Grahams Wheelers book. This one from the Almanac is pretty sound to.
View attachment 122040
Mark
Any good books you can recommended for purchase I'm quite the bookworm thanks for the advice I'll read up more
 

MHB

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The way the chemistry works means that you cant get low enough with just salts, you will need acid, I think my local has it in stock so if you cant get it try Brewman.
If I might suggest trying some well established recipes and getting the basics right first, before you head off on your own. Study up on a style and go for a simple recipe first. Good start if you want to make an Irish Red. Personally I like the one in Grahams Wheelers book. This one from the Almanac is pretty sound to.
View attachment 122040
Mark
This recipe I will try but what means can I increase FG without the addition of Maltodextrose, 1.011 seems a bit thin for my taste I like thicker beer
 

elmoMakesBeer

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Many recipes call for a mash temp of 66 deg in an attempt to maximise fermentability. If you use say 68 or 69 degrees the starch in the malt will be converted to a slightly less fermentable sugar, leading to a higher final gravity and slightly lower alcohol content. Palmers How to Brew covers this in far more detail than I have, as I expect most other brewing texts would too.
Other ways to end up with a higher final gravity include:
- using a less-attenuating yeast. I like Wyeast 1318 London Ale III but there are others that attenuate less - look for a description that mentions ‘finishing sweet’ or apparent attenuation % in the low 70s.
- add oats (not really my thing but many people like it)
- use less base malt and more less-fermentable malts such as crystal or roasted malts. This will have a massive influence on flavour
 
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Many recipes call for a mash temp of 66 deg in an attempt to maximise fermentability. If you use say 68 or 69 degrees the starch in the malt will be converted to a slightly less fermentable sugar, leading to a higher final gravity and slightly lower alcohol content. Palmers How to Brew covers this in far more detail than I have, as I expect most other brewing texts would too.
Other ways to end up with a higher final gravity include:
- using a less-attenuating yeast. I like Wyeast 1318 London Ale III but there are others that attenuate less - look for a description that mentions ‘finishing sweet’ or apparent attenuation % in the low 70s.
- add oats (not really my thing but many people like it)
- use less base malt and more less-fermentable malts such as crystal or roasted malts. This will have a massive influence on flavour
Oats, higher temp and the yeast seems like the go, is the oats very detectival in final flavour
 

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