Maturing Beer

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djackal

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Just have to share this with all.

Just got home from work and have cracked a bottle (500ml) of my 2nd all grain brew (a Hoegaarden clone (wit bier). I had tried one about 3 weeks ago and was pissed off...too bitter and full bodied, almost undrinkable..i felt over hopped, too many spices added and too much malt for water.

How things have changed.

The beer was brewed on OZ day so now almost 2 months old. It has smoothed out with a creamy head and that astringent character has almost gone except a slight touch on the finish, which is exactly what I wanted. It's full flavoured and drinkable..I'm stoked.

After 2 all grains in my new system, I've got a Heferweizen and a Wit Bier that would appeal to most lovers of quality beer. They are not world beaters but reflect the style, have character and most importantly no infections which would piss me off after all the hours cleaning, brewing and bottling.

Just had to share that with all of you as many here have helped me either directly or indirectly with their comments or advice and I'm now confident that I can go forward with my brewing. Cheers!
 

pint of lager

brewing on the verandah
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Congratulations Jackal on enjoying the fruits of your efforts.

Beer will continue to change its characteristics as it matures.

One very important job of a brewer is to keep sampling from a batch and then consume it at its peak. The only way to determine the peak is to sample many many different brews. Ahhh, such hard work.
 

bconnery

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One very important job of a brewer is to keep sampling from a batch and then consume it at its peak. The only way to determine the peak is to sample many many different brews.
Sucks that doesn't it...
Yet somehow we soldier on :icon_cheers:
 

devo

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I can totally relate djackel. I had an english pale ale that I wasn't at all happy with right down to the last glass that I poured from the keg. But a few months later when I hooked into the some bottles that I made from the same batch I couldn't believe it was the same beer. Perfect conditioning and clarity, better yet I had guests over lapping it up.
 

solidghost

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I am always too eager when I do brewing and this has gotten me bad results.
Anyway, the best way to condition a beer is to put it somewhere where we don't see it.
 

Muggus

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I've found with bottled brews that is worthwhile to store a few for the long term and systematically try them and see what changes occur...it might improve, it might not.
I brewed a Beglian dark strong ale that was poor up until a YEAR in the bottle, by which time the hops had died down and the yeast-derived fruity character shone through very nicely. Sometimes the wait is worth it.
 

ben.robinson

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Eagerness is easy to combat with shear production, have rotation of about 8 kegs which gives a beer about 4 weeks mature before i rip into it :chug:
 

Ducatiboy stu

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One very important job of a brewer is to keep sampling from a batch and then consume it at its peak. The only way to determine the peak is to sample many many different brews. Ahhh, such hard work.

Yeah..well...that would explain the empty fermentors I have had come bottling time..... :ph34r:
 
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