Mash today Boil tomorrow?

Discussion in 'All Grain Brewing' started by UsernameTaken, 7/12/17.

 

  1. UsernameTaken

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    Posted 7/12/17
    I am going to mash today and boil tomorrow as I have heard you can do that!

    Is there anything I need to do differently to normal or look out for?

    Cheers,
    UNT
     
  2. manticle

    Standing up for the Aussie Bottler Moderating

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Can be done, has been done, carries inherent risks.

    If you need to do this (I did once), I'd recommend hitting an 80 deg mashout, then cubing into a very well sanitised, clean cube as a minimum.
     
  3. Bribie G

    Adjunct Professor

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Best to mash evening and boil morning. I've done this a few times. If you leave too long you can get off flavours as the mash starts to go off due to yeasts and bacteria.

    I usually leave mash insulated after raising it to mashout temp, and it's still late 50s by morning. Then drain and ramp to boiling.

    The process can dry the beer but that's what you might want.
     
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  4. UsernameTaken

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Ok, maybe I will not do this as I thought it could easily and safely be done?

    But if not, no problem!

    Cheers,
    UNT
     
  5. mofox1

    Wubba lubba dub dub!

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    Posted 7/12/17
    If you can get in a 10 - 15 min boil before leaving it then it should* be safe to leave until the next day. It will kill off most of the bugs that somehow survived an hour in the mid 60's, and since it's already in the kettle it will save a bunch of time the next day.

    *Based on a once off it-works-because-i-did-it advice from some guy on the interweb.
     
  6. MHB

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Search for overnight mashing, its far from a new idea, nor a good one.
    I just did and found over 10 pages of results.
    You can easily get unexpected flavours, if you haven't ended all the enzyme activity by mashing out well enough - hyperattenuation (really dry beer, more tannins, infections...
    Mark
     
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  7. Moad

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    Posted 8/12/17 at 12:15 AM
    I’ve had no major issues aside from a little extra efficiency from many extended mash outs. Not to say there aren’t risks or Negative effects, just I haven’t experienced or noticed them on my brewery.
     
  8. laxation

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    Posted 8/12/17 at 12:54 AM
    I think @Danscraftbeer did it for a beer and, if it was the one i'm thinking of, was delicious
     
  9. Danscraftbeer

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    Posted 8/12/17 at 2:25 AM
    ^ True Lax. The Summer of 59 swap beer was an overnight mash. I've done it a few times. Infusion to sacc temp between 62 to 69c and left in the esky until morning. Slow decline in temp the mash is at around 45c in the morning. Then sparge with ~72-76c water. I don't bother with mash out. A bit extra efficiency, no negative effects IMO. Last time I measured the pH and it seemed to drop from 5.2 to 4.8 whatever chemistry is going on there. Maybe a bit of Lacto activity I'm not sure maybe just gives a bit of tang but the wlp059 yeast has a bit of tang as a pretty good flavor actually.
    I listened to peoples methods of leaving the mash for days or even a week to deliberately get a Sour Mash. Overnight ~8 hours I thinks its all OK.
     
  10. Garfield

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    Posted 8/12/17 at 1:23 PM
    I did this once and got away with it but it's poor economics as you're boiling from cold so using extra gas or electricity. Unless you're trying to kettle sour you're brew I would avoid this method
     
  11. Beamer

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    Posted 8/12/17 at 1:27 PM
    I used to do mash overnight regularly, used a pre warmed esky (my mash tun) wrapped in a $10 camping mat. Only dropped one degree an hour then again I only let it sit for 9 hours max before sparge. Was a great way to be finished before lunch the next day.
     

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