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Maltodextrin Dry

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numnum

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Hi,I've done a search but can't seem to find an answer.if I add maltodextrin along with the low Carb dry enzyme,would the enzyme convert the maltodextrin therefore adding to the alcohol content but reducing the effect of head retention?I've never used maltodextrin before but would like to experiment with it for head retention.
 

numnum

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OK,just in case the question is confusing.I'd like to add some maltodextrin to my next brew,I have not used it before and would like to see the head retention and body changing effects.I also like to use the dry enzyme to cut down on the other body changing effects of beer,lol.my question is would I be wasting my time by using both the dry enzyme and maltodextrin in the same brew?would the enzyme turn the multodextrin into sugar and be eaten up by the yeast therefore being a waste of money?thanks.
 

Screwtop

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Sorry numnum if nobody has replied. A simple google search should reveal that Dextr'ose' adjuncts are fermentable by brewers yeast and Dextr'in'ous adjuncts are much less fermentable. Alpha enzyme should be able to convert dextrins, the degree of conversion depending upon how and where the enzyme is introduced during the brewing process.

Screwy
 

waggastew

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It should also be noted that there have been very few reports on AHB of successfully using 'dry' enzymes. If you are after a drier/thinner style of beer then maybe look into using dextrose/simple sugars or moving onto partial mashing with rice/corn.

If you are worried about head retention with thinner beers try pouring a Super Dry or a Corona into a beer glass. By the end of the first sip you will end up with less head than a married man...........

Stew
 

numnum

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Sad part is I'm married and know exactly what you mean,lol.thanks for your help,I did find an older thread advertising a low Carb beer,the maker was of the opinion that the enzyme ate the dextrose and maltodextrin with the same results.thanks again.
 

nathan_madness

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How low did you want to go? If you are mashing at 62-63deg for 60 to 90 minutes you will end up with a pretty dry beer with out the need to add anything else.
 

NewtownClown

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I get the impression you are going down the dry enzyme road to reduce the carbs in your brew.

If that is the case, you may want to search for information on low-carb beer myth. It is a marketing ploy designed to get the ladies to drink beer (the big suprise was that fella's fell victim to the BS and many a guy can be seen drinking from a bottle of Blonde - as if to say, "Hey, I am still a beer drinking man, but I am aware of my health". New age pussies).

In reality, the carb difference equates to half a handful of chips or 1 slice of bread.

Want to drink beer but avoid the calories? Brew lower alcohol beers.
 

numnum

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i if that is 1 slice of bread per pot,thats a lot of bread at the end of the night.a few of our drinking buddies are on diets and plans,im happy to put the enzyme in,i think its a good idea,all part of the home brew experimentation process.ill look up on the debate.
 

NewtownClown

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i if that is 1 slice of bread per pot,thats a lot of bread at the end of the night.a few of our drinking buddies are on diets and plans,im happy to put the enzyme in,i think its a good idea,all part of the home brew experimentation process.ill look up on the debate.
you're right 1 slice/pot is big. An entire loaf by the end of the night! It is more like less than half a slice

From Vic Health Exec-Dir. Todd harper

Low-carb beers have 0.9 to 1.9 grams of carbohydrate per 100ml, compared with about 3.1g for regular beer with soft drink up to 10g.

But it was not the carbohydrate in beer that caused the most weight gain, he said, it was alcohol and there was otherwise little difference in the alcoholic content of regular and low-carb beers.

"The more alcohol you consume the more kilojoules you consume, and so dressing it up as `low carb' really makes no sense in terms of your kilojoule consumption," Mr Harper said.

"If you want the healthier choice then a low-alcohol beer is the healthier one."

Mr Harper said the figures showed the need for tougher controls on alcohol marketing that could ban the use of "misleading" claims.


The big problem is the misconception that it is better for you therefore one can consume more....
 

numnum

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marketing departments certainly have people worked out,thanks for the info.ill have to rely on a placebo effect seeing the empty sachets around,lol. :)
 

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