Low Carb Ginger Beer

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Gaz1111

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New Member Post.
Learned members, I am hoping to see if I can do a low carb/low sugar ginger beer. I have enjoyed Ginger Beer for many years and I would like to make my own and try and knock the sugar content down but still maintain the alcohol percentage if possible.
I see some awesome recipes to try on here, but looking for a less sugar option if possible.
Cheers
Gary
 

Lefty

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Unfortunately when you decrease the fermentable sugars you also decrease the final ABV and decrease the carb level of the final product. The other issues include a lack of body (tasting thin) and the need to attempt to hide this thinness by providing a flavour and aroma kick via big dry hopping. The AMG enzyme will ferment out all of the unfermentable sugars and give you a higher ABV and zero carb final product and most will agree who has tasted a commercial version of zero carb, higher ABV products will agree that they miss the body that a regularly fermented beer has. I have been on the 'holy grail' for the last couple of years on getting a low carb, low ABV beer that is good tasting and presentable to friends but in reality (my case) something around 2.5 -3.0% ABV and 50% lower carb has proven very positive. Good Luck.
 

Gaz1111

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Unfortunately when you decrease the fermentable sugars you also decrease the final ABV and decrease the carb level of the final product. The other issues include a lack of body (tasting thin) and the need to attempt to hide this thinness by providing a flavour and aroma kick via big dry hopping. The AMG enzyme will ferment out all of the unfermentable sugars and give you a higher ABV and zero carb final product and most will agree who has tasted a commercial version of zero carb, higher ABV products will agree that they miss the body that a regularly fermented beer has. I have been on the 'holy grail' for the last couple of years on getting a low carb, low ABV beer that is good tasting and presentable to friends but in reality (my case) something around 2.5 -3.0% ABV and 50% lower carb has proven very positive. Good Luck.
Cheers Lefty,
So if I'm correct (and please excuse my newbiness) it's possible to decrease 'carb content' and thus ABV but still obtain something that is okay by using the AMG Enzyme (what is this please?).
It's worth having a crack even if I can knock back a few carbs and sugar content...
 

Lefty

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When you decrease the carb content by using AMG ( Deltazyme- from Hoppydays Brewing in Brisbane) you are fermenting out all the dextrins (normally unfermentable sugars in a standard brew) and that will increase the ABV in the final product. Commercial breweries use vacuum distillation to reduce the ABV of there product but that's not normally accessible for home brewers.
As with most brewing, experiment, document what you do and at some stage you will find a happy medium.
 

Gaz1111

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When you decrease the carb content by using AMG ( Deltazyme- from Hoppydays Brewing in Brisbane) you are fermenting out all the dextrins (normally unfermentable sugars in a standard brew) and that will increase the ABV in the final product. Commercial breweries use vacuum distillation to reduce the ABV of there product but that's not normally accessible for home brewers.
As with most brewing, experiment, document what you do and at some stage you will find a happy medium.
Cheers mate,
I'll give it a crack!
 

JDW81

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What is your ginger beer recipe? Is it basically sugar, ginger, lemon and yeast?

If you are only using simple sugars (and no malts) then using dry enzyme is pointless, as the simple sugars are 100% fermentable, and all that is left over is ethanol and CO2 (well probs a few other byproducts of fermentation, but nothing that resembles "carbs").

The only way I can see of reducing the "carb load" (which is essentially alcohol and residual simple sugar in drinks like ginger beer/hard lemonade) is reducing your overall sugar content, which may well reduce the quality of your brew.

JD
 

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