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Little creatures all grain clone recipe

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Tradie

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Just starting all grain brewing and would like a little creatures all grain recipe ,have done mini mash for a few years have the LC recipe for mini mash with extract
thanks
 

Sidney Harbour-Bridge

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Try this

 

Tradie

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Try this

Thanks mate
 

Malted Mick

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Hi Tradie Do a search on this website and their are multiple posts regarding LCPA. Very interesting reading. It appears they originally were using whole hop flowers. Were brought out and the recipe was changed. I have made an all grain version from Beersmith using Pale Malt,Wheat,Munich & Light Crystal. Hops were EKG for bittering, Cascade & Galaxy added late boil, whirlpool and dry. SAF-05 Yeast. Tasted nothing like LCPA but a nice drop none the less.
 

MHB

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Do have a look at the BrewBuilder one, it's very faithful to the original LCPA, there are a couple of tweak's for different methods.
One appears to be having an issue, just try another version.
Mark
 

Vic

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Try this one, very close to LCPA on tap. This one comes out at 4.7%. You could increase the grain to get it to 5.2% as per original LCPA.
 

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elmoMakesBeer

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Try this one, very close to LCPA on tap. This one comes out at 4.7%. You could increase the grain to get it to 5.2% as per original LCPA.
Thanks for sharing. It looks tasty. I’ve got a couple of questions about the salts if you don’t mind.
1. What is the purpose of the baking soda and chalk? Is there a particular water profile you are aiming for? I was under the impression that adding carbonates was generally undesirable, unless perhaps you had a really acidic grain bill (eg lots of dark malt) or water source. But if that were the case you wouldn’t have needed the acid malt.
2. Why add salts to the boil? Ca helps with mash efficiency but the boil is too late for that.
 

Vic

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This was the water profile as per BeerSmith for a "Hoppy Pale Ale" instead of adding to boil, second addition of salts can be added to sparge water.
 

MHB

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Thanks for sharing. It looks tasty. I’ve got a couple of questions about the salts if you don’t mind.
1. What is the purpose of the baking soda and chalk? Is there a particular water profile you are aiming for? I was under the impression that adding carbonates was generally undesirable, unless perhaps you had a really acidic grain bill (eg lots of dark malt) or water source. But if that were the case you wouldn’t have needed the acid malt.
2. Why add salts to the boil? Ca helps with mash efficiency but the boil is too late for that.
Frankly the whole recipe isn't much like LCPA! I have had a long conversation with a brewer who was making the first version (still the best) that's very much what the recipe in BrewBuilder is based on.
The were using Australian grown Golding for Bittering, it wasn't available in less than tons at the time so we chose a clean neutral bittering hop. The late hops were Cascade and Chinook flowers that were privately imported. Again not available to most in Australia, so reasonable substitution was made with US pellets.
Most commercial recipes are very simple, when you se lots of malts and heaps of hop additions you are probably looking at a recipe written by an amateur.

The idea that we should add Carbonates to water is ridiculous, well unless you have so much dark/black malt that your pH is going below ~5.2pH. I think it comes from the notion that brewers should copy famous brewing waters, even if they aren't making beer from that location.
Adding Carbonates Just means people don't understand water chemistry.

Its not at all uncommon to add more Ca to the kettle. The way Ca lowers the pH is by reacting with malt Phosphates. There is a very finite amount of available phosphate so there is a very real upper limit to the amount of change to the pH Ca can make. But in the process it is consumed.
Calcium is important for more than just mash pH adjustment, it is very important in the formation of both Hot and cold break, its is important to yeast metabolism and again at the end of fermentation helps yeast to flock and fall out of the beer.
You can add all the Ca you need at the start but some brewers especially ones with highspeed testing (see ISE Ca) like to make sure there is the right amount at the end of the boil.

Mark
 

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