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Light Lager Grain

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Rod

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I purchased a 1 kg bag of

light lager grain

by mistake

what recipe or style can I use it

as a steeped grain similar to crystal

what is it , wheat or malted grain ???

:rolleyes:
 

Nick JD

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You can use it in anything as it's a base malt (the stuff used to make the bulk of the maltose in a beer, not really to flavour it - the job predominantly of spec malts (which are alread malted and only need to be steeped)).
 

seamad

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Where has the edit function gone?

If you are not sure what grains need mashing or steeping check craftbrewer site, lists most grains. You probably have a pilsner or pale ale malt.
 

Rod

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Took a bit of looking but ,

my light lager grain is

six row malted lager used in mash brewing

ingredient list : cereal grain (barley)
 

manticle

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6 row? Usually the stuff that is found in the states rather than here. May have a higher protein content than most malt bought here.

Protein levels: Another important distinction between six- and two-row barley cultivars is in the average level of grain protein (3). A high protein level often indicates a thinner kernel with less starch available for conversion to malt extract. Acceptable six-row malting barleys may range from 12 to 13.5% protein, whereas two-row cultivars range from 11 to 13%; barleys with greater than 13.5% protein are rarely used for malt. The high temperatures and moisture stress frequently encountered in dryland conditions (under which most six-row barley is grown) can limit the amount of grain fill (starch synthesis) and thus result in higher protein contents.

The protein content differential is also related to genetic differences in how each cultivar accumulates protein during grain development. Total protein content is defined as nitrogen content x 6.25. Because the net loss of nitrogen during malting is minimal, the total protein content does not change greatly in the process. Much of the barley protein, however, is converted into a soluble form by proteolytic enzymes; a portion of this is further broken down into amino acids and peptides in the wort.

Six-row malts tend to yield higher levels of wort-soluble protein. The ratio of soluble protein to total protein is an indication of the extent of protein breakdown (modification) during malting: 40-45% is considered acceptable.

Higher protein malting barleys are generally believed to inversely reduce the level of malt extract in the kernel. In addition, high protein content can lengthen steeping time, cause erratic germination (especially if grain traders blend low- and high-protein barleys to meet protein limits), increase malting losses, and increase enzymatic activity and, ultimately, the level of dimethyl sulfide. High soluble protein levels can sometimes result in brewing or beer-quality problems.
From here: http://www.brewingtechniques.com/bmg/schwarz.html
 

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