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Larger Yeast On Ale Wort

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Wax

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I've made up a bunch of starters using whitelabs German Lager (WLP830) as per Batz' instructions (thanks for that Batz). I've but a lager and a pilsner down using this and their going fine. I want to put another brew down tonight but all I have is an ESB fresh wort American Pale Ale drum and this larger yeast.

Can I use the larger yeast on the Ale?
If so, should I ferment it at Ale or Larger temps?
If not, why? What would be the result?

Cheers
Wax
 

jaytee

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Odd you should mention that Wax, I also have a stock of starters courtesy of Batz's fine instructions and wondered what it would do to the tin of Coopers Lager that's sitting in the garage

On the lager yeast for ales, I read this comment on Wyeast 2124 Bohemian Lager which could be a starting point for you
"Also used for pseudo ale production with fermentations at 75 F, (24 C) which eliminates sulfur production"
 

lagernut

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I have just bottled a tooheys draught kit using the same yeast started at 21d & brought it down to 13d for 20 days no rest or lagering will test in 2 weeks & let you know how it went


Cheers
Lagernut :)
 

dicko

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Hi Wax,
Go for it mate and ferment it at the recommended temp for the lager yeast.
You will probably find it will produce a beer that is a bit more crisp and less cloying with sweetness than the say the american ale yeasts.
It will take longer to ferment but I think you will find the results interesting especially if you have done the same brew with an american ale yeast before.
Let us all know how you go.
Cheers
 

wedge

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Lager and ale yeast differ. There are some like Kolsh that take on the characteristics of both, however, the majority dont. If you ferment using a lager yeast at higher temps you will get some great ester like flavours. Likewise if you ferment at a too high temp for your ale yeast.

Likewise an ale, (or lager) yeast fermented too low.....will not ferment at all.

If you want to do it.

Just ferment you brew with the lager yeast at the correct temp. What determines whether your brew is an ale or lager is not the sugars/grains or hops but the yeast.

You can find the correct temps for your yeast on the various supplier websites out there.
 

lagernut

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Hello Wax

Have just tasted the tooheys draught kit with WLP830 not a bad drop big difference to the dried packet yeast. only one downside it has a funny smell hoping this will disappear with time :huh:


Cheers
Lagernut :chug:
 
J

Jovial_Monk

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Is the smell sulphury, lke rotten egg gas?

That will disappear in secondary with a bit of time

Jovial Monk
 

lagernut

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Hello JM

spot on rotten egg gas I`ll try & keep my hands off it for 2 months then try it ,its a bit hard because it does taste very good now after only 2 weeks :lol:


Cheers
Lagernut :chug:
 

Wax

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JM can you explain why the larger yest creates this sulphur smell? I done a few ciders which I fermented at lower temps for an experiment and they also generate the rotten egg odor. Is it more to do with the temp and rate of fermentation than the actual yeast?
 

Guest Lurker

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Some ale yeasts do it to. Thames Valley 1275 pretty much always gives off quite a strong sulfur odour when I use it.
 

barfridge

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you could always try to make a steam beer (also known as california common). This type of beer uses a lager yeast fermented at ale type temperatures.
 

PMyers

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wedge said:
Just ferment you brew with the lager yeast at the correct temp. What determines whether your brew is an ale or lager is not the sugars/grains or hops but the yeast.
Spot on Wedge! Too many people are of the opinion that Lager is a taste rather than a method of brewing. Make a stout with a lager yeast at 11C, CC'd for a few weeks at 0C, and you've got a lager - a stout-lager, but a lager all the same.

Cheers,
Pete

:chug:
 

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