kegging

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Doie123

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hi im just wondering with kegging can you store filled kegs without co2 and if so how long for?
 

akx

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One approach would be to naturally carbonate in the keg (adding beer from the fermenter, priming sugar, and storing at an appropriate temperature). As with all things, it will depend on type of beer, and storage temperature. I probably wouldn't store beer without some degree of co2 (bottle or carb'd) for fear of oxidation.
 

roller997

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Under no circumstances would I fill a keg without additional priming sugar or without adding CO2.

Akx is right in relation to oxidation which would be a real issue unless the fermentation has not quite completed and it is still creating CO2.

Oxidation post fermentation is a real issue and breweries spend a lot of money to try to reduce that to an absolute minimum. A mate worked at a brewery and they had a global directive to get their oxygen levels for bottled beer to quite a low percentage which would not be feasible for any homebrewer. For any beers with any hop flavours, it is critical to keep the oxygen at a minimum post fermentation.
To not purge a keg with CO2 beforehand and then not add priming sugar would make your beer taste stale quite fast, unless you fill the keg when it is nearing it's completion of the fermentation and still naturally creating CO2.
If you took that approach, the carbonation will be guess work at best and you might want to hook up your Reg to see what the carbonation is doing. IF it is above the range you can easily purge and if it is below, you could add priming sugar.

On a related note, I find that I get better carbonation with natural carbonation than with force carbonation with CO2. Natural carbonation does create more sediment and to combat that, some cut their stainless liquid pickup tube by 1-2cm. I am OK to taste test the first 1-2 hazy pints before it clears up.
I don't keg until fermentation is over as that allows me to bulk prime accurately and then fill some into bottles and the remainder into a keg. That way I have easy take away options while cleaning less bottles.

If you don't have a CO2 cylinder, another option is creating some CO2 by fermenting some fermentables in a separate keg and then using that CO2 created for your fresh beer to protect it. It is a bit more work and requires planning, so I would go for a 6KG bottle of CO2 from Kegland as it makes everything easier.
 

fifis101

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I don't mean to take over this thread but while talking about storage, where and how to do people store their filled kegs to keep them at a stable temperature?
So far I've been basically replacing my kegs as they run out in my kegerator. I have let one sit in the garage for 2 months over summer and it definitely affected the taste.
 

Hangover68

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I don't mean to take over this thread but while talking about storage, where and how to do people store their filled kegs to keep them at a stable temperature?
So far I've been basically replacing my kegs as they run out in my kegerator. I have let one sit in the garage for 2 months over summer and it definitely affected the taste.
I keep mine in the Laundry which is downstairs and partially dug in but when the weather warms up it goes into the keezer which has room for all 6 kegs i own.
 

FyneBrews

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Under no circumstances would I fill a keg without additional priming sugar or without adding CO2.

Akx is right in relation to oxidation which would be a real issue unless the fermentation has not quite completed and it is still creating CO2.

Oxidation post fermentation is a real issue and breweries spend a lot of money to try to reduce that to an absolute minimum. A mate worked at a brewery and they had a global directive to get their oxygen levels for bottled beer to quite a low percentage which would not be feasible for any homebrewer. For any beers with any hop flavours, it is critical to keep the oxygen at a minimum post fermentation.
To not purge a keg with CO2 beforehand and then not add priming sugar would make your beer taste stale quite fast, unless you fill the keg when it is nearing it's completion of the fermentation and still naturally creating CO2.
If you took that approach, the carbonation will be guess work at best and you might want to hook up your Reg to see what the carbonation is doing. IF it is above the range you can easily purge and if it is below, you could add priming sugar.

On a related note, I find that I get better carbonation with natural carbonation than with force carbonation with CO2. Natural carbonation does create more sediment and to combat that, some cut their stainless liquid pickup tube by 1-2cm. I am OK to taste test the first 1-2 hazy pints before it clears up.
I don't keg until fermentation is over as that allows me to bulk prime accurately and then fill some into bottles and the remainder into a keg. That way I have easy take away options while cleaning less bottles.

If you don't have a CO2 cylinder, another option is creating some CO2 by fermenting some fermentables in a separate keg and then using that CO2 created for your fresh beer to protect it. It is a bit more work and requires planning, so I would go for a 6KG bottle of CO2 from Kegland as it makes everything easier.
Once you introduce the wort to the priming sugar in the keg what temp do you store it at initially or do you plonk it straight into the fridge?
 

hotwaterpls

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Once you introduce the wort to the priming sugar in the keg what temp do you store it at initially or do you plonk it straight into the fridge?
At or around fermentation is ideal. It's a secondary fermentation so the yeast needs to be warm enough to consume the sugars you've introduced.

I'd be less concerned about specific temp for the small amount of sugars and fermentation happening vs early stages of a brew, but just needs to be warm enough for long enough.
 

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