Keg stops pouring after sitting

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mcgarryb

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Looking for suggestions.
I have purchased a 50 litre keg and using an A type coupler. The keg stops pouring after not being used for 24 hours. If I take the coupler apart and put it back together again beer flows and will keep pouring but when I come back next evening there is no flow. If I go through the process of taking the coupler apart and reassembling it flows again but next evening no flow again. Driving me crazy.
 

S.E

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What temperature do you have your fridge set at? Could it be ice in the coupler or line that breaks up or melts when you take the coupler apart and put it back together again?
 

mcgarryb

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Is there a one way valve in the coupler?
Yes. There is a plastic duck bill type valve on gas inlet. I will replace this and see if it makes any difference. I also have a one way valve in the gas line which I will replace as well. Thanks for you reply
 

mcgarryb

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What temperature do you have your fridge set at? Could it be ice in the coupler or line that breaks up or melts when you take the coupler apart and put it back together again?
Never thought of that. Fridge is set at 2 degrees but I will move it up a few degrees and see what happens. Thanks
 

fifis101

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Never thought of that. Fridge is set at 2 degrees but I will move it up a few degrees and see what happens. Thanks
2 degrees is pretty cold and definitely possibly that ice is forming. I know I recently cold crashed a brew. I set the fridge to 2 deg and I left the air lock on it. The water in it froze solid. I do have my temp probe inside my fermentor but it's still a possibility in your case. Definitely easier than replacing parts.
 

mcgarryb

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Thanks everyone for your input. It looks like it was a temperature issue. Knocked the fridge up a few degrees and seems to be fine now. Just moved house so haven't got my brewing gear organized right now. Never occurred to me that fridge might be too cold. Now to enjoy a few beers. Thanks again.
 

peteru

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Run beer lines away from the heat exchanger plate as contact with it is almost guaranteed to freeze the beer line at some point. If your fridge has a fan for circulating air, make sure it's turned on. If it doesn't, consider installing one, they make a huge difference.

If you want to experience the full flavour of your beer, I'd suggest a temperature range of 6-14℃ for most styles of beer.

Serve into glasses rinsed with filtered cold water that brings the glass temperature to the 10-20℃ range (about 5℃ above beer temperature). Glasses straight from the fridge (or worse, the freezer) are not as great an idea as most people think they are. Besides causing foaming, they will also carry unpleasant odours or even mould contamination.

Most venues in Australia serve beer too cold. There are times where I will order two beers ahead so the next glass has time to come up to temperature while I drink the first beer. Alternatively I will hold the glass in my hands trying to warm it up as quickly as I can.
 

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