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Js Golden Ale Recipe

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Kieren

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Hi all,
I would like to brew a beer similar to a James Squire Golden Ale and was wondering if anyone might have any recipes they would be willing to share or even ideas on what hops, grains and yeast would be the go?
Thanks in advance,
Kieren
 

Samwise Gamgee

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there's a little bit of info on the bottle along the lines of amarillo hops, malted wheat and barley...........or something like that
 

T.D.

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My last brew has come out quite similar to JSGA. I didn't brew it as a clone but it does have a lot of similarities. From what I have heard JSGA has a fair bit of wheat in it - this is probably the biggest difference to my recipe, it uses no wheat. Anyway, I only racked it to secondary last night and had a taste. It may change a bit once it sits in secondary for a while, and then bottled and carbonated, but at this stage it seems to be quite similar.

Batch size: 25L

2.75kg JW Pilsner Malt
2kg JW Traditional Ale Malt
100g Carapils
Northern Brewer @ 60mins (to achieve 27 IBUs)
25g Amarillo @ 10 mins
25g Amarillo @ flameout
White Labs East Coast Ale yeast (WLP008)

From the recipe you'd think it was really blonde coloured, but it is actually quite golden.

Anyway, that's just a suggestion - like I said, it isn't even bottled yet! The main thing is to use Amarillo late in the boil in smallish quantities, say 1g/L for flavour and aroma, as in my recipe above (the thing I like about JSGA is that it has noticable hop flavour but it is not overpowering - it is well balanced). Hope that steers you in the right general direction! :)
 

Kieren

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Thanks T.D.

Your recipe sounds good, might try it with a bit of wheat instead of the pale malt.

Cheers,
Kieren
 

jayse

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heres around abouts what i do.
20% wheat malt the rest half JWM pils and JWM trad mash around 66c starting gravity of about 1.050 but i make mine a little lower.
Around about 28 to 32 IBU and 1g per litre to finish in the last 5 mins.
yeast doesn't really matter much just about use anything within reason and maintain a cool ferment for a clean finish. Iv'e used 1026 and 1272 , both yeasts need a cool ferment though for this beer. Also need to be in top shape to pull of a clean fermentation.
To me extra fruity esters from yeast don't work all that well in this beer the amirrillo provides quite a bit of tropical fruit like mango and pineapple. If you hit that again with 1272 fermented at 22c you might find you have fruit punch. although it still will be a reasonble beer i think keeping the fruitiness from any yeast down to a minimal is best.
as stated in another thread the hops are all gone for the year but i have 100g for sale $100 is the current going price :p

Anyway thats my thoughts on making the beer.
Jayse
 

jayse

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T.D. said:
snipped>
Anyway, that's just a suggestion
[post="90708"][/post]​

Looks good and looks like we both have the extact same idea on how to make the beer :chug:

Jayse
 

SJW

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JAYSE
How would the 1028 WYEAST go with this type of recipe?
 

SJW

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As for the AMARILLO Marks Homebrew in Newcastle has got heaps of the stuff, I mean heaps. Give him a a call on 49 696696 he would love to sell u all some, i'm sure.

stephen
 

T.D.

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I really like this style of beer. I will definitely brew this one as one of my staples I reckon. Jayse, I like the look of your recipe - its probably closer to the real thing than mine (I know JS use quite a fair proportion of wheat in it). I might give that a whirl down the track.

Re the amarillo, I recently used both cascade and amarillo in an APA and while I was weighing out the quantities, I shut my eyes and had a smell of both varieties. There was literally bugger all effective difference between the two. I reckon you could easily use cascade in place of amarillo if it is too hard to come by.

:beer:
 

colinw

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I can see why you might think Cascade & Amarillo are very similar based on smelling the pellets. To me, pellets of both varieties have a citric/geranium like aroma which is quite similar.

However once you've made the beer, I find that Amarillo gives a much richer combination of fruits in the mouth than Cascade. Cascade tends toward a more pure citrus aroma and a "thinner" more grapefruit like character which lets bitterness shine through, whereas Amarillo has a rich tropical fruit punch sort of flavour with hints of stone fruits. I also think an Amarillo hopped beer can stand to have more bitterness due to the richness of the flavours imparted by the Amarillo. (Good heavens, I'm starting to sound like a wine tosser.)

Regarding Traditional Ale Malt - I find it always produces quite a dark wort compared to English pale malts, and now enter it as 3 degrees Lovibond like a Belgian ale malt. This seems to give a more accurate estimate of wort colour.

I wonder when this Amarillo mania is going to subside. Everyone (including me) seems to be in love with the variety.

cheers,
Colin
 

T.D.

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colinw said:
I can see why you might think Cascade & Amarillo are very similar based on smelling the pellets. To me, pellets of both varieties have a citric/geranium like aroma which is quite similar.

However once you've made the beer, I find that Amarillo gives a much richer combination of fruits in the mouth than Cascade. Cascade tends toward a more pure citrus aroma and a "thinner" more grapefruit like character which lets bitterness shine through, whereas Amarillo has a rich tropical fruit punch sort of flavour with hints of stone fruits. I also think an Amarillo hopped beer can stand to have more bitterness due to the richness of the flavours imparted by the Amarillo. (Good heavens, I'm starting to sound like a wine tosser.)

Regarding Traditional Ale Malt - I find it always produces quite a dark wort compared to English pale malts, and now enter it as 3 degrees Lovibond like a Belgian ale malt. This seems to give a more accurate estimate of wort colour.

I wonder when this Amarillo mania is going to subside. Everyone (including me) seems to be in love with the variety.

cheers,
Colin
[post="90742"][/post]​
I think that's a pretty fair assessment of Cascade vs Amarillo. In terms of hop flavour, I find cascade to have more of an "edge". Amarillo to my tastes is more fruity in flavour. It may also depend on the batch and origin though, because I made an APA a while back using cascade and it was a fruity little bugger - hardly any of that cascade bite I was expecting! But then my latest APA had the bite.

They are quite similar hop varieties though, there's no debating that. If I couldn't get amarillo (as is currently the case :angry: ), I am more than happy to substitute cascade in its place. :chug:
 

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