Quantcast

Is table salt with cracking agent ok to use as sodium chloride?

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

Aussiedrifter

Well-Known Member
Joined
24/5/11
Messages
56
Reaction score
10
i've been recently playing around with water in my brewing. I was just wondering about table salt as listed in beer smith (which i believe is sodium chloride). i bought normal unionised table salt but they all seam to have a cracking agent in them, this one has (554) is this ok for brewing?
 

Bribie G

Adjunct Professor
Joined
9/6/08
Messages
19,838
Reaction score
4,393
554 Sodium aluminosilicate is the anti caking agent - I'm sure the salt doesn't mind being cracked B)
Given the tiny quantity I'd certainly use normal table salt myself, in fact added a half tsp to a dark ale once, didn't notice a lot of difference.
 

peas_and_corn

I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I cannot mash that
Joined
13/9/05
Messages
4,686
Reaction score
144
Location
South Australia
You need to be careful, you don't need much sodium to push the sodium ions into the flavour threshold. I was chatting to QB the other day and he did the maths and in a 22l batch, based on the anstey hill profile, you only need about a teaspoon to start getting into the detectable range.
 

Online Brewing Supplies

**** OBS ****
Joined
17/5/06
Messages
4,739
Reaction score
639
Location
The Dean WA
Aussiedrifter said:
i've been recently playing around with water in my brewing. I was just wondering about table salt as listed in beer smith (which i believe is sodium chloride). i bought normal unionised table salt but they all seam to have a cracking agent in them, this one has (554) is this ok for brewing?
Why not just use cooking salt and remove the doubt ?
Same place the supermarket.
Nev
 

mabrungard

Well-Known Member
Joined
21/12/12
Messages
126
Reaction score
104
Don't worry about the anti-caking agent. It is at low concentration. The main thing to avoid with table salt is iodine. Be sure to seek out salt that states that it is non-iodized.

Sodium in brewing water is a welcome component...at low concentrations. You can read more about ion effects in brewing water here.
 

TidalPete

BREWING BY THE BEACH
Joined
2/8/04
Messages
5,182
Reaction score
480
Location
Sunshine Coast, Queensland
mabrungard said:
Don't worry about the anti-caking agent. It is at low concentration. The main thing to avoid with table salt is iodine. Be sure to seek out salt that states that it is non-iodized.

Sodium in brewing water is a welcome component...at low concentrations. You can read more about ion effects in brewing water here.
+1
 

pmastello

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/9/11
Messages
181
Reaction score
8
mabrungard said:
Don't worry about the anti-caking agent. It is at low concentration. The main thing to avoid with table salt is iodine. Be sure to seek out salt that states that it is non-iodized.

Sodium in brewing water is a welcome component...at low concentrations. You can read more about ion effects in brewing water here.
What's wrong with iodine? I use iodine to sanatize my kegs and brewing equipment and the level of iodine in iodised table salt will be miniscule compared to that.
 

Aussiedrifter

Well-Known Member
Joined
24/5/11
Messages
56
Reaction score
10
Thanks guys. I think I'm safe then. I'll be putting 1.6g in the mash as calculated by beer smith and it is defenently non iodized sea salt. I'm brewing Firestone walkers mission street pale ale this afternoon and I want to replicate their water.
Which is
Calcium 75ppm
Magnesium 12ppm
Sodium 35ppm
Sulphate 120ppm
Chloride 100ppm
Up until now I've got away with chalk, gypsum ect but I couldn't get to these amounts without sodium chloride this time.
 

mabrungard

Well-Known Member
Joined
21/12/12
Messages
126
Reaction score
104
Gingerbrew said:
What's wrong with iodine? I use iodine to sanatize my kegs and brewing equipment and the level of iodine in iodised table salt will be miniscule compared to that.
I'm hoping you see the irony in your statement. It is a sanitizer because it can be lethal to microbes, including yeast.

However you are correct, its unlikely that you would contribute enough iodine to water through iodized salt. Its just that it is clearly counterproductive to the yeast we are trying to propagate in a ferment. Use any salt you like. I'll select the salt that is non-iodized if given a choice.
 

manticle

Standing up for the Aussie Bottler
Joined
27/9/08
Messages
25,707
Reaction score
6,120
Location
Glenorchy, TAS
Don't forget sodium is toxic to yeast too when at too high a level.
 

pmastello

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/9/11
Messages
181
Reaction score
8
mabrungard said:
I'm hoping you see the irony in your statement. It is a sanitizer because it can be lethal to microbes, including yeast.

However you are correct, its unlikely that you would contribute enough iodine to water through iodized salt. Its just that it is clearly counterproductive to the yeast we are trying to propagate in a ferment. Use any salt you like. I'll select the salt that is non-iodized if given a choice.
No irony at all. Iodine based sanitizers are no-rinse. At the concentration you find when using as a sanitizer, it is effective at killing microbiological contaminats. When diluted with 22L of beer, the concentration of iodine has no affect whatsoever to your yeast or anything else. At the concentration of iodine added by adding iodised table salt to 22L of beer would be even less.
In my opinion (and I am happy to be corrected), iodised table salt would be no different to non-iodised table salt.
Doesn't address the OP's question though....
 

Screwtop

Inspectors Pocket Brewery
Joined
8/9/05
Messages
7,523
Reaction score
264
Location
Gympie
Used cooking salt in the kettle before moving to the current location, local water here is 60ppm sodium so no longer use it. Had not heard of the anti cracking/caking additive. So decided I would do what any good "Google Brewer" would do and look up an answer for you.

Found this: Sodium ferrocyanide, also known as yellow prussiate of soda, is sometimes added to salt as an anticaking agent. The additive is considered safe for human consumption.

We get to consume some yummy chemicals eh!

Screwy
 

stux

Hacienda Brewhaus
Joined
15/12/09
Messages
2,978
Reaction score
310
I've got a bag of kosher salt. Use it for sausage making etc.

Anyway it's pretty much flakes of salt no more, no less. It's flaked because it'd cake if it was granulated

I think SWMBO found it at IGA
 

Aussiedrifter

Well-Known Member
Joined
24/5/11
Messages
56
Reaction score
10
Stux said:
I've got a bag of kosher salt. Use it for sausage making etc.

Anyway it's pretty much flakes of salt no more, no less. It's flaked because it'd cake if it was granulated

I think SWMBO found it at IGA
 

Aussiedrifter

Well-Known Member
Joined
24/5/11
Messages
56
Reaction score
10
Yer I found some sea salt at a gormat supermarket near our house. It had no cracking agent, which just put my mind at rest.
Thanks guys
 
Top