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IPA ideas?

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mattdean4130

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Hey all!

So I was going to shoot for a Four Wives type fruity Pils for my next brew... BUT the lager fermentation process seems a bit complicated for where i'm at right now (and i don't have temp control setups etc etc)

So, i've been thinking;

Coopers Selection IPA
1kg LDM, maybe some extra Dex to get IG around 1040

POR for bittering, but not too strong (maybe 45 minutes?)
SAAZ and Galaxy (well, Chinook as my local didn't have Galaxy) for flavour/aroma (i'm thinking around 20min, and maybe 0min?)
I also have some Green Bullet lying around..... Wasn't planning on using it but open to suggestions.

But amounts i'm stumped.
I want something that's not too heavy, but not super light drinking (Kind of like a CPA) but with some fruity/spicy flavours (not super strong, but not super subtle either)

Maybe 20g of each is a good start?

What's everybody's thoughts....

Cheers!
 

mattdean4130

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Lord Raja Goomba I said:
AIPA, IIPA, DIPA or EIPA?

That will determine your base kit and hops and then go from there.
Umm, sorry but you've lost me.

I have this can.
 

Liam_snorkel

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the kit will already be bittered. search for ianh's kit & extract spreadsheet and have a play around.
 

slash22000

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You don't need any bittering hops, the IPA can is already quite bitter.

Also, that's a weird combination of flavour/aroma hops. POR, Saaz and Galaxy? Ditch the POR, ditch the Saaz, they are not style appropriate to IPA's (at all). Galaxy would be fine though.

How exactly are you going to be adding those hops? You can't boil the stuff inside the can or you'll ruin the whole point of it, unless you're using the 1 KG of malt to make a mini-boil for hop additions.
 

Lord Raja Goomba I

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So you've got a fairly bitter English style IPA on the card.

Look at ianh's spreadsheet and go from there.

BJCP guideline for an EIPA here (this will help you construct a recipe based on the style you wish to achieve - though because you have a kit base, some elements aren't relevant (like "using Pale Malt") - but it'll give you an idea of what flavour, hops and yeast to use):


13.1 English IPA [BJCP]
Appearance: Colour ranges from golden amber to light copper, but most are pale to medium amber with an
orange-ish tint. Should be clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy. Good head stand with
off-white colour should persist.
Aroma: A moderate to moderately high hop aroma of floral, earthy or fruity nature is typical, although the
intensity of hop character is usually lower than American versions. A slightly grassy dry-hop aroma is acceptable,
but not required. A moderate caramel-like or toasty malt presence is common. Low to moderate fruitiness, either
from esters or hops, can be present. Some versions may have a sulfury note, although this character is not
mandatory.
Flavour: Hop flavour is medium to high, with a moderate to assertive hop bitterness. The hop flavour should be
similar to the aroma (floral, earthy, fruity, and/or slightly grassy). Malt flavour should be medium-low to mediumhigh,
but should be noticeable, pleasant, and support the hop aspect. The malt should show an English character
and be somewhat bready, biscuit-like, toasty, toffee-like and/or caramelly. Despite the substantial hop character
typical of these beers, sufficient malt flavour, body and complexity to support the hops will provide the best
balance. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable, and fruitiness from the fermentation or hops adds to the overall
complexity. Finish is medium to dry, and bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh. If high
sulfate water is used, a distinctively minerally, dry finish, some sulfur flavour, and a lingering bitterness are usually
present. Some clean alcohol flavour can be noted in stronger versions. Oak is inappropriate in this style.
Mouthfeel: Smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel without hop-derived astringency, although
moderate to medium-high carbonation can combine to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt
sweetness. Some smooth alcohol warming can and should be sensed in stronger (but not all) versions.
Overall Impression: A hoppy, moderately strong pale ale that features characteristics consistent with the use of
English malt, hops and yeast. Has less hop character and a more pronounced malt flavour than American versions.
History: Brewed to survive the voyage from England to India. The temperature extremes and rolling of the seas
resulted in a highly attenuated beer upon arrival. English pale ales were derived from India Pale Ales.
Comments: A pale ale brewed to an increased gravity and hop rate. Modern versions of English IPAs generally
pale in comparison (pun intended) to their ancestors. The term “IPA” is loosely applied in commercial English
beers today, and has been (incorrectly) used in beers below 4% ABV. Generally will have more finish hops and
less fruitiness and/or caramel than English pale ales and bitters. Fresher versions will obviously have a more
significant finishing hop character.
Ingredients: Pale ale malt (well-modified and suitable for single-temperature infusion mashing); English hops;
English yeast that can give a fruity or sulfury/minerally profile. Refined sugar may be used in some versions. High
sulfate and low carbonate water is essential to achieving a pleasant hop bitterness in authentic Burton versions,
although not all examples will exhibit the strong sulfate character.
Vital Statistics:
OG FG IBUs SRM ABV
1050-1075 1010-1018 40-60 8-14 5.0-7.5%
 

Byran

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The IPA I just put down is the most interesting one i have done.
Tastes soooo good from the fermenter. Just used a pack yeast of SO5 I had lying around.
All BB Pale malt Base with a handfull of Roasted malt, 200 grams of Cara 2 and 200 grams of Biscuit

Hopped it to about 45 IBU (low but lovely)
Simcoe to bitter, then citra, mosaic, amarillo, galaxy and cascade to finish
And im gonna dry hop it right now with mosaic and citra.
About 6.5% ABV
Fucken wow its great.
 

mattdean4130

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slash22000 said:
You don't need any bittering hops, the IPA can is already quite bitter.

Also, that's a weird combination of flavour/aroma hops. POR, Saaz and Galaxy? Ditch the POR, ditch the Saaz, they are not style appropriate to IPA's (at all). Galaxy would be fine though.

How exactly are you going to be adding those hops? You can't boil the stuff inside the can or you'll ruin the whole point of it, unless you're using the 1 KG of malt to make a mini-boil for hop additions.
Well, i guess my logic was;

Saaz for spicyness, Galaxy for passionfruityness....

I usually boil about 5L with my LDM, dex and hops - and then add the kit tin for the last few minutes of the boil...
 

mattdean4130

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Perhaps a pale ale kit would be a better tin to use for this one? To be honest i don't really know what possessed me to use the IPA, just seems to get a lot of good press.
 

BeerNess

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agree with the others about checking the spreadsheet,

my 2 cents is that you will have more than enough bitter in the can, if you're doing a boil then add some of your chinook & green bullet @ flameout and then dry hop a 50/50 mix of chinook/green bullet (about 2g/litre) after 4-5 days of fermentation. If you're not doing any boil then just chuck 2+g/litre of 50/50 mix of chinook/green bullet in the fermenter. so for a 23l brew that would be 20-25g of each dry hopped and about 10g of each at flameout if you're doing a boil. Just my opinions - but i've never used that coopers kit, haven't done any kit brews for a while either.

I'm not a fan of POR, just dont like it. i love Saaz, but not really appropriate for an IPA imo - save it for a lighter flavoured brew as a flameout addition if you're an extract brewer.

Everyone's opinions differ about dry-hopping - personally if i am transferring to a secondary that's when i dry hope after the primary ferment has occurred. if i'm not going to do a secondary transfer then i throw my dry hop bag into the primary after about 4 days (usually when the krausen sinks back in). My personal preferences only - there are as many ways to dry hop as there are sweaty armpits in the world. :ph34r:

Have a great brewday and enjoy yourself with what ever you decide to do!!! :chug: :chug: :chug:
 

mattdean4130

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Well, i kinda just went with it here on this one.

Followed a recipe on the coopers site for an original IPA style (1kg LDM, 500gm Dex 20ltr ferment) but i did 10g Chinook and 5g Saaz @ 10 minutes, and the same at 0 minutes. The hope is to add a little fruity spicey to an otherwise strong robust beer... We'll see how it goes!

What's life without a risk or two!
 

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