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Information Overload

Discussion in 'Welcome!' started by Coxy_syd, 22/2/19.

 

  1. Coxy_syd

    New Member

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    Posted 22/2/19
    Hi All

    Really keen to get into home brewing.
    The more I read the more confused I am on where and how to start.

    I think I'm going to start pretty simple. Go to the brew shop buy a kit and go from there. Start simple and then play with ingredients and techniques later.
    Maybe even getting into AG in the distant future.

    One problem I have is space inside the house which makes be think I should be temp controlling from the start as we have a spare fridge outside.

    Is it as simple as as getting a plug and play temp controller like the inkbird 308, heating pad or coil and plugging it all in? Or do I need to modify the fridge in anyway?

    I have an inkbird 6 probe thermometer for the BBQ that I'm happy with so I'll probably going with a brand I already use.

    While not brewing can I use that fridge as a normal fridge?
    We only really use it when we are having a lot of guests over for something.

    Does it matter that it is a fridge/freezer or should I be looking at getting a fridge only?

    I will be bottling at least to begin with.
    A guy at work told me not to bother with plastic and go straight to glass.
    Any opinions on that?

    Any other begginers advice would be much appreciated.

    Thanks and sorry for the long rambling post.
     
  2. YAPN

    Well-Known Member

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    Posted 24/2/19
    This is a good way to start.

    Definitely go with temp control during fermentation. There are plug 'n play options available that don't require any fridge modifications. I use a fridge because someone explained that a temp controller will ruin the freezer part. Best to use either a fridge or freezer, not a combined unit. A lot of people use chest freezers that can fit up to 3 fermenters.

    I'm still using 1.25lt PET mineral water bottles from the stupormarket. Had no problems with them.

    Cheers and enjoy.
     
  3. JDW81

    I make wort, the yeast make it beer.

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    Posted 24/2/19
    Coxy,

    You can't move for information and advice regarding brewing. This forum is a great resource, and most of the information on here is very good, however it is hard to know where to start.

    I'd recommend going to your local home brew shop and get them to set you up with the gear to start making kit beers, If they're worth their salt, they'll recommend everything you need and nothing you don't. Where in sydney are you? I'm sure others can recommend a good home brew shop for you (I haven't lived in Sydney for > 10 years).

    Things you need to pay most attention to early on are cleaning and sanitisation, yeast quality and temp control. If you take care of those basics, the rest pretty much looks after itself.
    - Sanitisation: You gear needs to be clear before you can sanitise it. You can wash with a small amount of dishwashing liquid with a soft cloth and rinse thoroughly (there are a few other cleaning options - sodium percarbonate/PBW etc, but you can worry about those later). Once clean, I'd recommend using a no rinse sanitiser like star san. It's easy to use, and a widely regarded product. A small bottle will last ages. Just follow the instructions.

    - Yeast: Throw away the kit yeasts, they're pretty much useless. For you first brews use a dry yeast like Safale US05. It's a great, clean and easy to use yeast that gives you reliable and consistent results. I'd pitch 2 packs into a 21L batch (again you can worry about cell counts for yeast down the track).

    - Temp control: If you've got a spare fridge, that's brilliant. This time of year you won't need a heating belt/pad. Just plug the fridge into your temp controller (STC-1000/Keg king controller/whatever you've got), attach the probe to the side of your fermenter under a couple of layers of neoprene (chop up an old stubby holder and tape it to the fermenter) and set at 18 degrees if you're making an ale.

    As far as packaging goes, stick with bottling early on. You can keg later (it can add a layer of complexity you don't need when starting out). Glass of PET doesn't really matter. The coopers PET bottles are good, however I've only used glass (you'll be surprised how quickly you build up enough bottles - drink long necks, hit your mates up).

    Hope that helps.

    JD

    P.S. Find yourself a good local home brew shop (even if its a bit of a drive) as they will be your best source of information early on.
     
    Last edited: 24/2/19
  4. Coxy_syd

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    Posted 24/2/19
    Thanks for the detailed reply, I'll take all that advice on board.

    I'm in Western Sydney, Country Brewer @ Prospect is pretty much on my way home from work so they will be my go to home brew shop due to the convenience, I plan on popping in there this week.
     

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