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How To Keep Beer Prior To Kegging

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benf

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Hi, as I am now doing 60 litre batches and currently only have 2 corny kegs, there is around 20 litres that needs to sit waiting for a keg to become free. This could be a month or two depending on batch rotation etc.. What is the best way to hold this beer to avoid it deteriorating? Is there a non-refridgerated method as my fridge space is limited. Beers are usually Ales of Pale, Brown, Amber or Red varieties of US style.
Thanks for any suggestions.

Cheers
QM
 

QldKev

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Hi, as I am now doing 60 litre batches and currently only have 2 corny kegs, there is around 20 litres that needs to sit waiting for a keg to become free. This could be a month or two depending on batch rotation etc.. What is the best way to hold this beer to avoid it deteriorating? Is there a non-refridgerated method as my fridge space is limited. Beers are usually Ales of Pale, Brown, Amber or Red varieties of US style.
Thanks for any suggestions.

Cheers
QM

Bottle it or keg it.

Kegging is probably easiest. Buy another keg, put beer in it, and throw sugar in it like a big bottle. Then you can leave it out of the fridge to carb up. When you need it just swap it into the fridge and keep going.

QldKev
 

BPH87

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If you no chill you could just store them in cubes prior to fermenting. Then keep one fermenting at all times?
Or just buy more kegs like QLDKev reccommended.
Cheers
Ben
 

Bats

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I'm with BPH.

If you don't want to invest in more kegs or bottle, have a go at the 'No Chill' method. Store your 60L in 3 x 20L cubes.

That way you can just ferment one when you know a keg will soon be free.
 

benf

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Thanks, that makes loads of sense, other than that I have a pretty good chill process set-up so like my fast chilling post boil. That being said, why can I not just fill sterilised cubes with my chilled wort then ferment when required? Can the wort be held at room temperature over long periods of time OK?
 

Dazza88

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if you want to store cubes of wort for days or weeks before fermenting, fill the cubes with hot wort aka no chill. cold filling will result in infections.
 

Bats

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if you want to store cubes of wort for days or weeks before fermenting, fill the cubes with hot wort aka no chill. cold filling will result in infections.
+ 1

The reason No Chill works well is because the hot wort sanitizes the cube due to the high temp as it goes into the cube. Once it's sealed, it's sanitized and good for storage.

Puting unfermented chilled wort into a cube is going to be dangerous. It may work most of the time providing it's cleaned and sanitized well enough but if something was to go wrong, it will using this method.

IMHO. More people should be No Chilling. I'll never go back.
 

BPH87

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If you are doing 60L batches to save time and brew less, definitely try the no-chill option.

I do this and have a fair stockpile of cubes waiting to be fermented, a mate of mine brews triple batches (like you) and has about 20 cubes ready to go all the time! Bloody handy if you don't have time to brew all the time.

I have a pretty good chill process set-up so like my fast chilling post boil.
If you have a really hoppy beer that you are going to brew and ferment straight away (and have the keg space) chill it straight away.

BTW less to clean up on brew day with no-chill.

Cheers

Ben
 

woodwormm

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I'm in a similar boat, setting up to brew (not consume) less...

i've got 6 cornies I think, maybe 7, but kegs aren't my issue it's keg fridge space, so depending on current stockholdings my intention is to be flexible with my no-chill and chill regime, sometimes i'll chill and ferment out all 60 litres, other times no-chill 20/chill 40 or no-chill 40/chill 20, that way I can stock whichever part of the 'warehouse' that needs an inventory top up.

I actually think I may end up with a massive stockpile of no-chill cubes as I love the brew process and creating things and my consumption is already too high compared to my waistline and exercise regime!
 

Florian

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If you want to keep chilling, why not try no chilling only one cube?

Fill a cube with hot worth, chill the rest. Then ferment the cube whenever you're ready.

This will also give you a great comparison between both methods.
 

benf

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OK, you've convinced me on the no chill idea, would make things very flexible and like the idea of having cubes of various varieties sitting waiting for fermentation. Couple of basic questions on no chill (without turning this into a no chill thread).

1. how much difference will there be in hop prfile between no chill and chilled beers given that most my beers have large amounts of hops additions in the 10min - flame out time period?
2. can no chill cubes be kept at ambient temperature?
3. where are people buying their cubes from (although I am in NZ we have most the same big box stores here as in Aus.). What do you need to look out for when buying a good cube?
 

benf

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Oh, one more question. When chilling in the kettle I get really good settling of the trub and get a very clear run-off into the fermenters. If I run off 20 litres into a cube for no chilling at flame-out, is it the idea that the trub will just settle out in the cube?
 

BPH87

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OK, you've convinced me on the no chill idea, would make things very flexible and like the idea of having cubes of various varieties sitting waiting for fermentation. Couple of basic questions on no chill (without turning this into a no chill thread).

1. how much difference will there be in hop prfile between no chill and chilled beers given that most my beers have large amounts of hops additions in the 10min - flame out time period?
2. can no chill cubes be kept at ambient temperature?
3. where are people buying their cubes from (although I am in NZ we have most the same big box stores here as in Aus.). What do you need to look out for when buying a good cube?
1. A more experienced brewer can answer this, as I am still getting my processes right. 2. No-chill cubes just need to be kept at a stable temperature, preferably as cool as possible (not refrigerated) and in the darkest spot you have available. Mine sit in my garage cupboard with a sheet over them. 3. There is a place in Brisbane that sells them for approx $8, People in Plastic, surely there would be a similar place where you are? Catering places also stock them or can get them. 4. After flame out I just try to get a little cone, and then let it cool in the kettle for 10mins then drain into a cube, pretty much no trub in the cube. So you could do that then start chilling.
Sorry for any typos, on my phone.
Cheers,Ben
 

Verbyla

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5. Could a cube be left for a few months before fermenting it?

I always buy crushed grain and it would reduce the frequency of my trips to the G&G if I could just have a few full cubes waiting around
 

BPH87

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5. Could a cube be left for a few months before fermenting it?

I always buy crushed grain and it would reduce the frequency of my trips to the G&G if I could just have a few full cubes waiting around
I think so, I have left mine a maximum of 2 months before brewing. An APA and a Vienna Lager and both were great beers, just dry hopped the APA heavy.

Edit: At one stage I had 6 cubes waiting, 2 in fermentation stage and 3 full kegs. So it gives you the option of having a few different types ready to go.
 

keifer33

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Most definitely. There was conversations in another thread if 12 months. I've had a few 6 monthers that I had forgotten about and they where fine.
 

Nick JD

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How about fermenting the beer, racking to a cylindrical vessel and putting in the deep freeze?

Thaw it and carbonate it 6 months later.

EDIT: on that note, could you could freeze a cube for a year and then ferment it? Not gonna spoil at -18C no matter what's in there.
 

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