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Help needed for this beginner

Discussion in 'Announcements and Support' started by Lenz, 6/10/18.

 

  1. Lenz

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    Posted 6/10/18
    hey guys!
    I’ve been brewing for about 6 months now and I’m loving it!! I haven’t made the jump to boiling just yet I’m still using the malt extract cans, and I have a quick question about them.
    No matter what brand I use or the difference I make in the brewing process, my beer always has the same tangy home brew taste! Is this becuase it’s all canned slop?
    This question has properly been asked before, but any help or advise would be very much appreciated
    Thanks boys
     
  2. Maheel

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    Posted 6/10/18
    do you temp control your ferment in a fridge with temp controller etc?

    do you use the yeast that comes with the kit ?

    do you use white sugaz with the can - o - goo ?

    tell us more about your methods
     
  3. altone

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    Posted 6/10/18
    Yep like @Maheel says - more info would help
    But I think the 2 main suspects are too high a ferment temp and using
    normal sugar if you do that assuming your sanitation is already under control of course.
    Kits like Coopers suggest something like 21-27C to ferment whereas most here would suggest closer to 18C
    With the added sugar, even if you are using dextrose or a "brew enhancer" mix, it might be worth trying more
    Light Dried Malt Extract instead.

    I always tasted a slight kit twang until I started adding less white sugars and more malts and steeped specialty malt.

    Although it could just be because I was more experienced and had got the process more under control especially temperatures when I started doing that.

    let us know what your process is and someone will help you on your way :)
     
    koshari likes this.
  4. Lenz

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    Posted 6/10/18
    Thanks for the reply Maheel
    I use a fridge with a temp controller and a heat pad in case it gets to cold.
    I never use the yeast that comes with the tin I always buy different ones.
    Admittedly I use the same brand dextrose sugar with most of my brews.
    I keg all my brews, let them cool over night to 3 degree then force carbonate.

    Thankyou
     
  5. Lenz

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    Posted 6/10/18
    Thanks for the reply Altone
    I set the temp always between 18 and 22 degrees, and yes I do keep everything sanitised as possible.
    Thankyou for the tips. I might start boiling and give that a go.
     
  6. YAPN

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    Posted 6/10/18
    I remember that metallic tang. It was the reason I stopped brewing the first time.

    You'll get good advice here. A couple of things that worked for me was steeping some grains (pretty easy to do) and also waiting. Leave your bottles for longer before drinking.
     
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  7. JOSEY

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    Posted 6/10/18
    Hi all.. i am also a very new brewer.. well maybe shouldn't call myself that lol
    I brought a coopers pale ale kit and used the yeast it came with tiny little packet.. upon researching i have read that two of these packets are needed for 23lt bucket.. can some one clarify if i need a second packet please.
    Thanks
     
  8. Lenz

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    Posted 6/10/18
    Awesome thanks for the tips yapn
     
  9. YAPN

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    Posted 7/10/18
    Short answer...no.

    But 2 packets, or a better yeast from your local homebrew shop will likely do a better job.

    If you are happy with how it turned out, well, thats all that counts.
     
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  10. motman

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    Posted 7/10/18
    In my opinion, it is almost impossible to make a good beer with a kit. I’d suggest getting a simple single vessel brewery for all grain and it’ll blow your mind how much better the result is.
     
    JOSEY likes this.
  11. FarsideOfCrazy

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    Posted 7/10/18
    Lenz how long are you fermenting for? Once I get to fg I'll generally leave it for about 5-6 days then I'll crash chill to 3-4c for a week. I find it gives the yeast a bit of time to clean up some of the off flavours from the fermentation.
     
  12. keine_ahnung

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    Posted 7/10/18
    Hi Lenz,

    welcome to the dangerously addictive world of brewing! :)

    As already offered here, there are lots of opportunities to optimise your current brewing. But, as someone who started with kits in the bathroom as a student, to becoming a full-time officially qualified brewer in Germany, and now studying the Braumeister....my best advice would be, don't let yourself get overwhelmed by the mountain of learning ahead of you.
    Small steps. Brewing should be fun!

    Everything above^ is definitely helpful advice, but of course it's hard to pinpoint exaclty what the causes are and what exactly "tangy" means.
    One thing that hasn't been touched on, but is very possible is: oxidation.

    Basically, as soon as beer has started fermented, you want to keep exposure to oxygen to an absolute minimum (zero - if possible).
    Since you already have kegs, you could considering "lagering" your beers, just like the germans started doing hundred of years ago.
    i.e. at the end of fermentation, transfer the beer from the fermenter to a keg. You can either do this when the beer is 80% fermented, with a manometer and pressure-relief on the keg - then you get a natural carbonation of the beer :)
    If this is too much time/money investment for the time being, you could transfer the beer when it's finished fermenting. If you can force carbonate, you must have CO2 on-hand - give the empty keg a good "CO2" wash before transferring th beer. That'll reduce your oxygen exposure at least.

    This also has the very impourtant benefit of getting the beer off the "spent" yeast. Basically you want to get the beer off the yeast as soon as possible without compromising fermentation.
    And even with racking, the small still-active and fit portion of yeast that is still in suspension stays with the beer and keeps working.---->>> doing the extremely important job of breaking down unpleasant bi-products from the yeast during the fermentation.


    Cheers and happy brewing!
    Joe
     
  13. altone

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    Posted 8/10/18
    Oh yes - very good point!
    Don't just dump from your fermenter tap into a keg, run a length of silicon hose from tap (or racking cane) to the bottom of the keg
    to reduce the chance of oxidation.
    Although I'd describe oxidation as more often tasting like wet cardboard rather than tangy or metallic.(yes I've done it back in the old days - still drank it though :) )
     
  14. JOSEY

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    Posted 8/10/18
    This one im affraid will be terrible.. not much fermentation i can see..tthought that it wouuld bubble alot more..but time will tell. Thanks for the help muchly appreciated
     
  15. Thomas Wood

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    Posted 9/10/18
    I was recently in the exact same boat. The biggest difference for me in removing/minimising that twang was lowering my fermentation temperature from 21*C to 18*C (then going back up to 20*C right before cold crashing... still experimenting here), and rehydrating good yeast properly at 37*C.

    Brew day doesn't take any longer and my kits are getting better with every brew.

    I also use 500g of Dry Light Malt and 500g of Dextrose rather than 1kg of Dextrose FYI.
     
    JOSEY likes this.
  16. brewgasm

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    Posted 9/10/18
    You could try using 1kg of dried lme and leave the dextrose and maltodextrin out of it. Whenever I do a kit I only add dlme because that is what I like.

    They cost a little bit more but have you tried a fwk yet?
     
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  17. nathanvonbeerenstein

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    Posted 9/10/18
    I think the very broad and I exact advice you’re getting (though most are good suggestions) could be narrowed in by a bit more information.
    How would you describe the taste you’re getting apart from ‘tangy home brew taste’? (Not a flavour haha)

    Answer these questions, they’re common off-flavours in beer:
    Does it taste like cardboard?
    Is it a metallic taste?
    Does it taste a bit like unripe apples/cidery?
    Does it taste a bit vegemitey?
    Does it taste too bitter?
    Does it taste medicinal?
    Does it taste astringent/tannic/like sucking on a tea bag/red winey?

    At such an early stage in your brewing, I’m sure like all of us, no single part of your process is perfect (and that’s normal and expected :) ) so the more info you could give us, the more we can help solve the thing troubling you most and get your next batch better!

    At this stage though - bin the dextrose and any other white powder.
     
  18. TheSumOfAllBeers

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    Posted 9/10/18
    Well he can use it up for priming. But for main fermentation this is good advice.

    To give a reference: most of the macro lager in the world is using a fairly hefty proportion of dextrose in its fermentables.

    Often 1/3 abv comes from corn syrup, and essentially has no flavour, but it’s cheap.

    When you drink an all malt lager side by side with it, even by an upstart brewery that won’t have the lagering skill if it’s macro peers, it will kick its arse.

    That’s how important all malt is. Especially for beginners. Mixing in non malt sugars to good effect is an advanced skill
     
  19. YAPN

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    Posted 9/10/18
    Sometimes you get no activity in the airlock, it just happens like that. Don't give up just yet, see what it tastes like when it's finished.
     
  20. chiefbrewlord

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    Posted 16/10/18 at 8:13 AM
    I get great beer using coopers extract kits. Infact it's way better than bought beer, the standard ones anyway, and people beg me for it. I really like cerveza and pale ale kits. I do however add a bit of light dry malt, Pelet dry hops from eBay (galaxy) and ferment below 20 degrees. Also only make 19L instead of the 20 something they recommend.
     

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