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Hello all! Some help for a noob?

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Jourdo

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Hello all!

Iv just got a Coopers home brew kit and am very keen to get started! Been doing a lot of reading and research from this site and I have a couple of quick questions..
All I have at this stage is the standard lager kit ingredients and temps in my area are starting to drop (still around 20 during the day, but just below 10 at night). Will this be a problem? From what I have read the fermentation temp for lager is lower than ales etc. Will the kit yeast work in these conditions or should I do away with it and grab something different from the brew shop? (I plan to wrap the fermenter in a blanket at night to stabilise it as much as possible).
Also, what temperature should I get the mix to before adding the yeast?

Thanks so much in advance!
I'm such a noob now but i know with lots of practice and time spent on this site I'll be brewing some nice beverages before long :)
 

Jourdo

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I think I'll try S189 yeast.. My research isn't finished but it looks like it might be a winner..
 

wbosher

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The kit yeast is probably an ale yeast, so 20 will be fine. As you said you will want to keep it nice and cosy at night time though.

You want to be in the same ballpark temperature wise when you pitch the yeast, around 18-22ish. Remember to throw away the kit instructions and follow the advice here regarding temperature and ferment/conditioning time.

Have fun. :)
 

wbosher

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Jourdo said:
I think I'll try S189 yeast.. My research isn't finished but it looks like it might be a winner..
I'd stay away from lager yeast until you've got a brew fridge or some other way to keep the temperature down. 20 is way too high for lager yeast. Keep it simple for now and use the kit yeast, it will be fine.
 

tricache

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Also remember for lagers a big yeast starter is very helpful so ale yeast for now will be fine
 

Adr_0

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as you and wbosher alluded to, consistent temperature is important. keeping it wrapped up, in a cupboard, etc. can help insulate against big swing in temperature. pick up a decent dry ale yeast (the yeast is dry, not the ale...) and try to pick somewhere with consistent temperature after you've wrapped your fermenter.

IMO, the biggest step in beer quality comes from good yeast in good quantity fermented at the correct, consistent temperature.
 

wbosher

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Adr_0 said:
as you and wbosher alluded to, consistent temperature is important. keeping it wrapped up, in a cupboard, etc. can help insulate against big swing in temperature. pick up a decent dry ale yeast (the yeast is dry, not the ale...) and try to pick somewhere with consistent temperature after you've wrapped your fermenter.

IMO, the biggest step in beer quality comes from good yeast in good quantity fermented at the correct, consistent temperature.
Normally Id agree, but I think for the first brew the OP is best to stick with the kit yeast. Coopers dry yeast is pretty good, and most kit yeasts are a lot more forgiving to temperature swings.

My advice is to concentrate on the basics like cleaning, sanitising, and temp control, then worry about trying different yeasts and playing around with hops etc..

Get that first brew (or two) under your belt so you know what you're doing, then experiment.
 

Adr_0

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wbosher said:
Normally Id agree, but I think for the first brew the OP is best to stick with the kit yeast. Coopers dry yeast is pretty good, and most kit yeasts are a lot more forgiving to temperature swings.

My advice is to concentrate on the basics like cleaning, sanitising, and temp control, then worry about trying different yeasts and playing around with hops etc..

Get that first brew (or two) under your belt so you know what you're doing, then experiment
Absolutely.
 

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