Gladfield malted corn

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yankinoz

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Has anyone tried it, either alone or with other malts? If used in a mostly barley-malt mash, is there any advantage in taste over flaked, unmalted corn?
 

An Ankoù

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I'd be interested to know, too. As far as I can tell, it's unique to Gladfield- certainly not available in sunny Brittany.
 

MHB

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I was under the impression that you can’t "Malt" maize the way you can Barley, Wheat, Rye, Oats...
In that yes you can sprout it but that doesn’t lead to their being any enzymes produced that we could use to mash the maize, it would remain an adjunct not become a base malt.
I don’t know what sprouting maize would do for its brewing attributes that degerming (to reduce lipids) and micronising doesn’t do for Maize Grits.
Reading the Gladfields it reads just like the one for micronised maize from anyone else.

Mark
 

yankinoz

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I was under the impression that you can’t "Malt" maize the way you can Barley, Wheat, Rye, Oats...
In that yes you can sprout it but that doesn’t lead to their being any enzymes produced that we could use to mash the maize, it would remain an adjunct not become a base malt.
I don’t know what sprouting maize would do for its brewing attributes that degerming (to reduce lipids) and micronising doesn’t do for Maize Grits.
Reading the Gladfields it reads just like the one for micronised maize from anyone else.

Mark
I was under the impression that you can’t "Malt" maize the way you can Barley, Wheat, Rye, Oats...
In that yes you can sprout it but that doesn’t lead to their being any enzymes produced that we could use to mash the maize, it would remain an adjunct not become a base malt.
I don’t know what sprouting maize would do for its brewing attributes that degerming (to reduce lipids) and micronising doesn’t do for Maize Grits.
Reading the Gladfields it reads just like the one for micronised maize from anyone else.


South American chicha brewers report that they "malt" maize, which is reassuring, considering that the old household method of conversion is to chew and spit it out. How their malting methods may differ from the usual, I don't know. I believe US whisky distillers generally use cooked corn and convert starches with barley malt or enzymes.

One part of Gladfield's description limits normal use to 25% in beer and 50% for distilling. But further down the description they say it can be used at 100% of grist, which suggests diastatic power. Whatever it is, they also say it helps dry out the beer, which unmalted corn does, and conttributes less malty flavour than barley malt, which raises the question why use it at all? I don't know, so I asked.

My impression of Gladfield is that they're throwing a lot of different malts against the proverbial wall, to see which ones stick, I've used quite a few. All made good beer, and I loved some. On others I found their claims a bit overstated.
 

MHB

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Pretty much agree on Gladfields and good for them, nice to see innovative products being tried.

On the native maize beer, the chewing is to provide salivary amylase, as maize has none. You don’t want to know what they used as a yeast supply!
The 25/50% ratios for brewing and wash making are about the same as for any other adjunct. Worth remembering that the Barley fraction for wash making is likely to be 6-Row malt with a higher enzyme content than we usually find in 2-Row, for the latter around 40% adjunct is probably the limit.
The one number I can’t find is the lipid content. Flaked maize has the germ removed (mostly used to extract corn oil).
It won’t sprout without the germ so I suspect the lipid content of the "malted" maize is going to be a lot higher, similarly with protein. The use of adjunct in north American brewing is largely driven by the need to dilute the high protein content of 6-Row malt with low protein starch. The malted Maize is about twice as dark as the flaked product which could be from extra protein engaging in maillard reactions during kilning. Not much detailed information around unfortunately.
I'm pretty confident that if you wanted to use it at 100% you would be needing exogenous enzymes.
Mark
 

yankinoz

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."You don’t want to know what they used as a yeast supply!"

That reminds me of the old joke where the greasy spoon customer goes into the kitchen and sees the cook shaping hamburger patties in his armpit. The counter guy says, "Ah, that's nothing, you should see how they make their donuts."

Thanks.
 
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MashBasher

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Baby poo for yeast @MHB?

i’ve used the Gladfield malted corn. It was subbed in for flaked corn in a euro style pils I’ve made many, many times before.

I didn’t count on it providing any diastasic assistance and if anything my OG was a bit low. But I’d put that down to me, not the product.

Gladfield state that their malted corn doesn’t require boiling like untreated grains do. So that’s a good thing and useful. I suspect that’s all the “malting” is meant to accomplish.

Two observations from use:
1. It’s a bugger to mill. The kernels are large and wouldn’t go through my three roller easily. They just bounced around between the top rollers. If I ever use it again I’d drive over the bag with the car first. It’s quite brittle.

2. Far less contribution to flavour than other forms of corn/maize. That might be a good thing or not, but in my case it wasn’t what I was looking for.

So in summary not a bad product, may require adaptation of processes to use well and potentially useful, if you understand its characteristics.
 
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An Ankoù

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The bottom line seems to be that, unless you want to save ruining your dentures making chicha, there's no advantage over using flaked maize in a grain bill.
 

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I dont post to often anymore but have some pretty strong feelings about this product. I have used in my commercial brewery and will never use it again. Firstly it is ugly and more grey than yellow. When milled it turns to flour and caused a stuck sparge. Lastly it did not provide that lovely corn flavour nor yellow hue that I wanted in my euro-style lager (Kiwi Lager is what we call the beer). In fact the beer came out darker than my pils, which I dont understand based on the colour spec of the malted maize. I am brewing the beer again tomorrow and have gone back to flaked corn and hope for a shorter brew day. Love Gladfield Malt and pretty much use it exclusively at the brewery but this is not a good product.
 

An Ankoù

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I dont post to often anymore but have some pretty strong feelings about this product. I have used in my commercial brewery and will never use it again. Firstly it is ugly and more grey than yellow. When milled it turns to flour and caused a stuck sparge. Lastly it did not provide that lovely corn flavour nor yellow hue that I wanted in my euro-style lager (Kiwi Lager is what we call the beer). In fact the beer came out darker than my pils, which I dont understand based on the colour spec of the malted maize. I am brewing the beer again tomorrow and have gone back to flaked corn and hope for a shorter brew day. Love Gladfield Malt and pretty much use it exclusively at the brewery but this is not a good product.
I love trying to get hold of new and hard to find malt (Gladfield is unknown in France as far as I iknow) and hops and trying them out to see what they're like. I'll give this one a miss though, thanks for the info.
Drawn a blank trying to get hold of Tangerine Dream hops, too. We can get most Kiwi hops here, but this one, no.
 

duncbrewer

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Drawn a blank trying to get hold of Tangerine Dream hops, too. We can get most Kiwi hops here, but this one, no.
This might be your only chance,

but I can't see me getting a plant to you given the current travel difficulties.
I have planned to purchase these in August and see if I can get them to grow, it's pretty sunny where we live but very windy on occasions.

They were called wtd 005.

Try Getting hold of Nectaron even more difficult.
 

An Ankoù

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This might be your only chance,

but I can't see me getting a plant to you given the current travel difficulties.
I have planned to purchase these in August and see if I can get them to grow, it's pretty sunny where we live but very windy on occasions.

They were called wtd 005.

Try Getting hold of Nectaron even more difficult.
I'd be happy enough just to get a couple of hundred grams of cones to try them out. I'm not sure how a rhizome, coming out of your winter would transplant into our late summer and autumn to face another winter again, but I'm not a professional hop grower even though I grow a few varieties in the garden. I had already contacted wild about hops and the Courtneys were kind enough to give me a complete list of about 8 reasons why exporting the rhizomes to Europe was just a non-starter. They had already tried to export the cones and that came up against a brick wall, too. I'll just have to be patient for these varieties, I suppose. I hadn't heard of Nectaron, but I see that they are available through a few European suppliers, except they're mainly out of stock, I'll keep an eye open for the 2021 harvest coming in. Thanks.
 

duncbrewer

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I'd be happy enough just to get a couple of hundred grams of cones to try them out. I'm not sure how a rhizome, coming out of your winter would transplant into our late summer and autumn to face another winter again, but I'm not a professional hop grower even though I grow a few varieties in the garden. I had already contacted wild about hops and the Courtneys were kind enough to give me a complete list of about 8 reasons why exporting the rhizomes to Europe was just a non-starter. They had already tried to export the cones and that came up against a brick wall, too. I'll just have to be patient for these varieties, I suppose. I hadn't heard of Nectaron, but I see that they are available through a few European suppliers, except they're mainly out of stock, I'll keep an eye open for the 2021 harvest coming in. Thanks.
We can't get the 2021 Nectaron here, seems to have all been snapped up by the commercials as the next en trend hop.

One packet in my freezer which I need to plan to use.
 

An Ankoù

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We can't get the 2021 Nectaron here, seems to have all been snapped up by the commercials as the next en trend hop.

One packet in my freezer which I need to plan to use.
While it's listed by a number of suppliers, the 2020 crop is universally out of stock. I wonder, then, if we'll see any of this year's crop. Is a good 'n?
 

duncbrewer

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While it's listed by a number of suppliers, the 2020 crop is universally out of stock. I wonder, then, if we'll see any of this year's crop. Is a good 'n?
I'll let you know, expect it's best for a dry hop addition in a Hazy of some kind.
 
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