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Bribie G

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Serious composting is a simple process but you need to have bulk.
Many people confuse compost heaps with worm farming. They are two different beasts.

For a proper compost heap you need to gather together a heap of organic green material and some animal poop etc to provide the microorganisms. The purpose of composting is to actually make manure without it passing through the colons of beasts.

Really you need to get the heap at least a metre high, then layer the weeds, clippings, leaves etc with cow manure from the paddock or from a bag from Bunnings, or even a bag of dog chow. Then moisten and turn weekly. You then get an exothermic fermentation, not unlike brewing, and the heat will kill weeds and seeds - mostly.

Big compost heaps like you used to get behind racing stables before the modern era when they just cart the soiled straw and shit away, will actually steam with the generated heat and in the old days haystacks would sometimes get wet and compost and get so hot they would burst into flames.

With my grass fed heaps I just check what's happening by spearing a thin bamboo stake into the middle and periodially [porn alert] pulling it out, feel it, and stick it back in - it gets quite hot.
 

manticle

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Yeah that's pretty much how mine started. Green waste, chook bones, spent grain, everything bar the things previously mentioned. So steaming hot, the entire bin once blew itself off the pile.

Worms were not introduced, they just have congregated and now anything I put in breaks down to chunky wet soil in a matter of days.

Might experiment with a few clippings and see what happens
 

Ducatiboy stu

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I had a place previously and for the garden bed I just placed stable rakings on the ground about 60cm deep at the start of autumn. I was getting the stable rakings for free in a trailer once a week for months

It stunk a bit, but come spring it had basically broken down into the soil and was only about 100mm thick, but holy ****...anything planted in it went ballistic and there where no weeds

Its the best stuff if you have stables near by
 

wide eyed and legless

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Best way to remove unwanted lawn is to cut it like turf and put in a pile out of the way green side down and leave for 6 months or so and it will make a great top soil.
Its funny how worms get everywhere, when making compost tea in a sealed drum when I opened the drum months later the top floating layer on the tea is full of worms, I presume worm eggs go in with the weeds and as they can lie dormant until conditions are right that is how they get in there.
I did read somewhere recently about the depths worms go to being influenced by cosmic rhythms and that they can live up to 10 years old, when they mate they inseminate each other, a sort of worms version of a sixtyniner.
 

Garagebrew

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I don't have the space for a compost heap (I probably do but still) but the worm farm is by far the best thing I've bought for my garden, nothing better than having a use for food scraps you'd otherwise throw away.
I bought another one second hand to add an extra layer to the original and I'm thinking of using the remaining trays and base of the second unit as a little hydroponic set up for my chilli seedlings.

Excellent thread by the way, always a good read and great info
 

manticle

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Best way to remove unwanted lawn is to cut it like turf and put in a pile out of the way green side down and leave for 6 months or so and it will make a great top soil.
Its funny how worms get everywhere, when making compost tea in a sealed drum when I opened the drum months later the top floating layer on the tea is full of worms, I presume worm eggs go in with the weeds and as they can lie dormant until conditions are right that is how they get in there.
I did read somewhere recently about the depths worms go to being influenced by cosmic rhythms and that they can live up to 10 years old, when they mate they inseminate each other, a sort of worms version of a sixtyniner.
Good to know - exactly how I've gone with this lot of turf - upside down so the roots are exposed and die.
 

SnailAle

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Home killed lamb shanks, can't beat em! The broccoli is mine. Pretty happy with it, generally the florets don't hang as tight in my homegrown ones.
20171011_204033.jpg
20171011_204028.jpg
 

manticle

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You got sheep?
Nice way to eat, being part of every step, from animal to plate.

Only four legged animals we got here, besides the rat in the shed, are the two cats that have so far failed to catch it. Cat shanks might reduce my vet bills but would make me and my lady sad (and a bit weird).
 

SnailAle

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You got sheep?
Nice way to eat, being part of every step, from animal to plate.

Only four legged animals we got here, besides the rat in the shed, are the two cats that have so far failed to catch it. Cat shanks might reduce my vet bills but would make me and my lady sad (and a bit weird).
Grew up on a farm, between that and a bit of hunting we try to source most of our meat ourselves. As you mentioned I really enjoy being a part of the whole process and knowing where my food comes from.

Cut up some pigs on the weekend so tomorrow night is a pork belly and homemade apple cider night, should be good!

Haha well you never know slow cooked cat might surprise you. I've got a few of the buggers always in my yard trying to get the budgie. Might be a good solution!
 

wide eyed and legless

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what a difference 4 weeks make, lesson one for these new beds is to plant dwarf vegetables.
004.JPG Almost to the day one month later.001.JPG
Only thing added to the soil was compost and Dynamic lifter, I presume that because damaging insects can't get to them they grow more vigorously.
Destined for tonight's dinner complimenting a lamb shoulder Broccoli, Rainbow Chard, Broad beans and peas will put the beans and peas through a blender using manticles recipe. And I am in 2 minds whether to go and lift some baby potatoes.
Rhubarb for desert.
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Manticles recipe.
Grabbed a bunch of the bigger broad beans, shelled, blanched and popped off skins.
Cold pan, olive oil, chopped garlic, lemon zest, fresh thyme and oregano, salt and pepper. Slow heat for 15 mins, add beans and a small amount of water, another 10-15.
Blitz while hot with lemon juice and flat parsley.
 
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manticle

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Mmmmmmmmmmmmm. Our broad beans are starting to sprout so I can get some of that going again soon.
Thanks for the reminder.
 

goomboogo

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You got sheep?
Nice way to eat, being part of every step, from animal to plate.

Only four legged animals we got here, besides the rat in the shed, are the two cats that have so far failed to catch it. Cat shanks might reduce my vet bills but would make me and my lady sad (and a bit weird).
Cats can't be eaten for many reasons, not least, because they are likely to taste of smugness.
 

wynnum1

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Cats can't be eaten for many reasons, not least, because they are likely to taste of smugness.
When are Channel Nine's A Current Affair's Tracy Grimshaw going to do a story on how a Victorian man lost 20 kg in a month eating only cat and then a follow up story Victorian man charged with animal cruelty.
 

Ducatiboy stu

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I too grew up on a farm.

Every year ( in winter ) we would do a big steer in the paddock, just lift it up with the forklift, slaughter, gut and skin, hangover night and take it to the butchers and hang it for a week or so then he would cut it up

We used to split it with the Italian neighbors who would do a big baconer pig and another bloke who did a a few lambs

The salami and ham the Italians did was out of this world. Proper old school salami and ham. Used to come home from school and there the salami's and hams would be, hanging under the verandah. Usually took about 6 weeks till we go them. They didnt tell us when they where ready, they just brought them around when they where.

I miss those neighbours
 

Grott

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Try silver beet - steam to well wilted, heat frypan with good virgin olive oil, crushed garlic and chilli flakes. Add silver beet and stir through. Really delicious. (Do same with cooked Brussel sprouts, cut in half or quarters)
 
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