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'fixing' A Bulk Priming Underestimation?

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Mr. No-Tip

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So I bottled my big double IPA about 12 days ago. Bulk primed with dextrose and a view to carb to 1.8 volumes.

The aim of 1.8 was via the IPA recommendation on this bulk priming calculator: http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/inde...w_post&f=30

At ten days it was still flat as a tack - not entirely surprising considering the Canberra winter temperature in my spare room, but since reading the example in Brewing Classic Styles and the 'medium to medium high' carbonation description in the AABC style guidelines, I think the carbonation should be closer to 2.5 volumes.

I am sure the beer will be drinkable at 1.8, but I am thinking of comping it as I am otherwise happy with the beer - but I think a higher carb would help.

I cracked a few the other day and put some carb drops in, but thought that would end up overcarbing in the long run. I am now thinking of doing the same approach with a bulk priming calculator and add enough dex to get .7 volumes (the difference from the 1.8 already in there).

Do these approaches create some oxidation risks? Or anything else that would make increasing the carb more risk than benefit for a comp?

Advice appreciated.
 

black_labb

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Serve the beer warmer, problem solved

edit: If you want some for a comp try adjusting some but not all of them so you can decide which seems better at comp time. Make sure you dissolve some sugar/dextrose in some liquid and add like that (from a syringe is ideal). Putting dry dex/sugar will create nucleation points and cause the beer to suddenly foam out of the bottle. I'd consider chilling the beer right down for a day or so before this to minimise lost carbonation. Why not try a couple carbed with honey?
 

manticle

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So I bottled my big double IPA about 12 days ago. Bulk primed with dextrose and a view to carb to 1.8 volumes.

The aim of 1.8 was via the IPA recommendation on this bulk priming calculator: http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/inde...w_post&f=30

At ten days it was still flat as a tack - not entirely surprising considering the Canberra winter temperature in my spare room, but since reading the example in Brewing Classic Styles and the 'medium to medium high' carbonation description in the AABC style guidelines, I think the carbonation should be closer to 2.5 volumes.

I am sure the beer will be drinkable at 1.8, but I am thinking of comping it as I am otherwise happy with the beer - but I think a higher carb would help.

I cracked a few the other day and put some carb drops in, but thought that would end up overcarbing in the long run. I am now thinking of doing the same approach with a bulk priming calculator and add enough dex to get .7 volumes (the difference from the 1.8 already in there).

Do these approaches create some oxidation risks? Or anything else that would make increasing the carb more risk than benefit for a comp?

Advice appreciated.
Whether or not I think you should be happy with 1.8 is irrelevant.

You can (and I have) calculate the exact volume of sugar solution needed to push up the carb to the volumes you want.

Calculate the total amount of sugar required to bring the full original volume of beer to 2.5.
Subtract what you already added and divide the result among the total number of bottles you had in the first place. That's the extra amount you need per bottle. Multiply that by the bottles you have left.

I prefer to add such things as a boiled solution with a syringe. The way I've done that is to dissolve my sugar in boiling water volume that I can easily measure and divide. eg If I had 10 bottles, I'd aim for 100 mL of water so I could add 10 mL doses that would be equal enough for these purposes. You could add dry but may get foaming problems.

Before doing any of this though, I would warm the bottles up so they are carbed. A couple of days in a warm water bath kept at around 20 degrees should be enough to get them moving from 'flat as a tack'

Then decide if you want to have a crack.

As for oxidation - adding sugar solution with a clean, sanitised syringe will enable you to reduce the splashing risk. Uncap and recap quickly.I doubt you'll find any issues doing it that way.
 

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