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First Time True Lager Brew

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Rod

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I have a lager in a temperature controlled fridge

between 8 to 11 degrees C

put in 8/5
now @ 18/5

sg 1048
now 1022

slower than expected

what do I do next

When do I start the diacetyl rest

I have read

To remove any diacetyl that may be present after primary fermentation, a diacetyl rest may be used. This rest at the end of primary fermentation consists of raising the temperature of the beer to 55-60 F for 24 - 48 hours before cooling it down for the lagering period. This makes the yeast more active and allows them to eat up the diacetyl before downshifting into lagering mode.

When do I start to increase the temperature , and by how much . i.e. 1 degree per hour and to 16 centigrade

When I cool it back down do I reduce by the same method

I will be bottling the brew and storing in the garage , reason for doing it now is when temperatures are low , 5 overnight , 18 in the day , best I can do

Should I rack after the rest , I will be bulk priming

How long before bottling
 

Nick JD

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That's about the right fermentation speed for a lager at that temp. What yeast did you use and what kind of lager are you making?

Does it taste like it needs a diacetyl rest? It's not compulsary - some yeasts, treated well son't make much diacetyl at all.
 

Rod

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That's about the right fermentation speed for a lager at that temp. What yeast did you use and what kind of lager are you making?

Does it taste like it needs a diacetyl rest? It's not compulsary - some yeasts, treated well son't make much diacetyl at all.
The yeast was a generic dried Morgans kit yeast I had in the fridge

The lager was a brew made up with bits I was using up , called it bubble & squeak :icon_cheers:

I have yet to finish it , let alone taste it

probably only a lager because of the yeast
 

mosto

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I'm also doing my first true lager (Carlton Draught clone, s23 yeast, ferm at 11 deg) and also noticed the fermentation is a lot slower than I expected, but just put it down to the lower ferm temp. Give it time, I started mine on 1/4 at 1038 and it reached 1008 about a month later (abour 5/5 i think).

Didn't have time to bottle until last weekend, but in the meantime I had the idea to cold crash (not going to bother with d rest) as I've never tried this before and read it could be very beneficial, especially for an Aussie Lager. So, has been sitting at around 4 deg since 9/4.

I plan to raise temp controller to about 11-12 deg when I get home tonight. I'm not going to bother raising in increments, as my heat source is just a small reptile/acquarium cord and, given the cool nights here at present, I think it will only rise gradually anyway. I plan to bottle on Sunday and, like you, will bottle condition in my shed.
 

Nick JD

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You'll find that if you run most lager yeasts at the north end of their temp range they'll ferment out about as fast as an ale at the bottom of its range.

Some lager yeasts will produce clean lagers (by "clean" most people refer to lack of fruity esters - which pretty much across the board, no lager should have) happily and quickly at 14C (generally the top of the lager range).

I've found that there's not much need to go below 10C unless you like waiting. YMMV, but I found no difference in the same recipe done at 9C and then at 12C. Both were clean using a Czech yeast. People have success with Swiss Lager yeast at 19C, but I find this is too high for my tastes. YMMV.

S23 is quite a fruity lager yeast at any temp IMO. I prefer 34/70 - which is the world's generic lager yeast commercially.

Most of the Wyeast lager yeasts will make a clean lager in the upper end of their temp range. In some cases, I find it's better to run them higher to avoid persistent sulphur notes common under 12C.

As always with brewing, yeast selection and health will have the biggest impact on your outcome that anything else by miles. Yeast defines beer.
 

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