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First brew some concerns

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Troy294

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Hi have just started brewing . My dad has done it for years but my first . I got a concern
I put my brew down and followed instructions as advised . I have a coopers larger .
It's been 2 days since I put it down and it's sitting about 23 degrees and my bubbler ( air lock ) going great guns . But now I have noticed when I opened the lid that all the white foam has now nearly gone . Is this normal with things settling down or does it mean something else .
 

verysupple

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Sounds normal to me. As the yeast get closer to consuming all the fermentables the activity level decreases and the krausen (foamy stuff on top) subsides.
 

Troy294

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Thanks very much for the quick reply I was a bit concerned . I have been told its right to bottle a week after its out down . I have been told that buy a few people . Now if I read the coopers instructions they advise different . If the air or temp or something is consistent over a two day period ! Is that right ???
 

Troy294

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And when is it right to drink . I have heard once bottled its fine to drink after two weeks- but I have also heard from 1 week as also heard one person tell me after a month u can drink it
 

verysupple

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You're on the right track. When your hydrometer readings are consistent over a few days it's safe to bottle (if you don't have a hydrometer you should get one ASAP - they're like $15). Most people leave their beer in the fermenter for at least a couple of weeks though, even if it only took 3 days to ferment, to condition it.

EDIT: You can drink it as soon as it's carbonated. It might taste better after a bit more time though.
 

Econwatson

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Well you shouldn't have taken the lid off your fermenter, you're inviting infection every time you open it up while you are fermenting. Try and keep it on in the future! :)

At 23c your fermentation is going to have gone pretty fast. That would explain your active fermentation for the first few days. If you had fermented at a lower temperature it would have taken longer. But just because your airlock has stopped bubbling doesn't mean fermentation has stopped. Don't use the airlock as an indication of whether your beer is still fermenting

I've never made a Coopers Lager kit before, but I would try and get the temperature down a little. Higher temperatures encourage weird fruity flavours in your beer.

And I leave my brews for 2 weeks in the fermenter. The general rule for when fermentation is complete is that you maintain a constant hydrometer reading for a few days. I leave my brews in the fermenter for 2 weeks, regardless of whether the fermentation is complete or not, since it allows gunk in your beer to drop out of suspension!
 

Troy294

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Never used a hydrometer . So ill go buy one . U learn something every day .
My dad didnt use nothing ever lo no temp gauges no hydrometer .
He used to mix it with two liters of boiling water and sugar fill with tap water , add yeast .
Let sit for one week - bottle it - let sit for 2 then drink . Lol
That's the beauty about home brew I can learn so much .
And this forum has already helped me out
 

Troy294

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My original temp was up around 28 when I first put it down . It's been 2 days now and on the temp strip the 24-22 marks have colour
 

verysupple

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Econwatson said:
I leave my brews in the fermenter for 2 weeks, regardless of whether the fermentation is complete or not, since it allows gunk in your beer to drop out of suspension!
Not just precipitating the crud out, the yeast clean up a lot of the bad tasting fermentation byproducts (diacetyl, acetaldehyde, DMS, etc.). Although the yeast will continue to do this in the bottle, it happens much faster in the fermenter.
 

Dan Pratt

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take some time to do some reading/research.

a good strting point is this bloke > >http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html

you dont have to read every page today, just check it out, its a good source for information about brewing. B)
 

yum beer

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First suggestion,
forget everything old dad has taught you. He has been, is and soon you will be drinking exactly what gives home brew a bad name.
28 to start...way too hot, 22-24 to ferment, way to hot....
read up and learn a bit.
Let this batch sit for 2 weeks before you bottle and crack 1 after 2 weeks, it will be a lesson you will not forget.
Good luck with it from her on.
 

Troy294

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With that being said . How do I lower the temp now ?? Or is it to late . Ill put the fan on in the room lol
 

GalBrew

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Its too late to worry now. It is most important in the early stages of fermentation. For future beers the gold standard is a fridge/heat belt with a temp controller. Other than that wet towels on your fermenter can reduce the temp, but you have no control over it. Search the forum for STC-1000.
 

warra48

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How do you keep your fermenter cool?
Well, the lucky ones among us will have a dedicated fermentation fridge, controlled with device such as a TempMate, an STC1000 etc.

Other than that, cover and wrap your fermenter with a wet towel, and have the fan blow on it. Keep the towel moist, so the evaporation works to cool your brew.
Or get yourself a fridge from a roadside pick up. Even if it's dead, you can put some frozen 2 litre coke bottles in there along with your fermenter, and it should work pretty well to keep the temperature down.
Or, if you are flush with cash, buy a working dedicated fridge, either new or used.
 

Troy294

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Wow I honestly didnt think temp control was such a major issue when doing home brew beer . So what do you guys recommend it should be when I put it down . The instructions on ( coopers larger ) say to add two liters of hot water followed by 20 l cold water ( tap water ) then It says yeast will ferment between 18- 32 degrees but they recommend 21-27 . See mine initially was 32 because I added two liters boiling water to start but now it's sitting on the 24-22 temp strip colours . So one would think it should be ok lol
 

GalBrew

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I think the first thing the new kit brewer needs to do is completely ignore the instructions supplied with the kit. Sure you will end up with beer, but not the best beer by a long shot. You really need to pitch double the amount of yeast normally supplied with a kit and keep it around 18 deg C to keep the ferment clean. You also don't want to pitch too high either or undesirable flavours may end up in the beer. Again, the yeast will ferment at higher temps very happily, but they will be pumping all sorts of crap into the beer which will negatively affect its flavour. Best thing to do is get your hands on an introductory brewing text such as "How to Brew" by John Palmer or the like and read up on the basics. It will end up consuming your whole existence. :beerbang:
 

Nedasaurus1

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hiya Trot it sounds like your Dad must have come from the same brew school i did. thats exactly how i used to brew but youll get plenhty of advice on here to make better beer. I used to do what ya dad did. mix the same 1 week later bottle any temp any anythinglol. mind you it was exactly what i was after...cheap beer so i wasnt about to complain...i brewed that way with my opal mining mates for 8 years...now i got abit more time i follow alot of the advice on here nad im making great beer...abit more expensive but still cheaper than the local anyday...and its much better beer also. welcome to the forums mate, cheers Ned
 

Troy294

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Hahaha yeah my dad was doing it that way for about 20 plus years but as with anything over the years there tends to be more science in regards to it , how to brew it better .
But I have learnt alot so much already in regards to beer . Pretty keen to play around with the brewing now . Best home brew I tasted when my mate did one with star anise and juniper berries in it .
There is so much to be done . Thanks to everyone on here for the GREAT advise
 

Truman42

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Star anise and juniper berries? Sounds like a Dogfish Head clone.
 

Troy294

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Chefs , that's what happens . And star anise and juniper berries go well together . So I can see why he tried it
 

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