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Fermenting Two Beers At Once?

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g-funke

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Hi all,
I did a forum search but couldn't find much on this topic.
To date, I've only fermented one beer at a time, but I'm planning on fermenting two ales simultaenously (I'll make sure they are both styles with the same temp range and will start and finish (cold crash) them at the same time).
My fermentation control is a fridge with cooling/heating temp control and I normally tape the temp probe to the carboy and insulate.
If I ferment two beers at once, should I just sandwich the probe between the two carboys?
Any other solutions?
Thanks
 

jlm

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Hi all,
I did a forum search but couldn't find much on this topic.
To date, I've only fermented one beer at a time, but I'm planning on fermenting two ales simultaenously (I'll make sure they are both styles with the same temp range and will start and finish (cold crash) them at the same time).
My fermentation control is a fridge with cooling/heating temp control and I normally tape the temp probe to the carboy and insulate.
If I ferment two beers at once, should I just sandwich the probe between the two carboys?
Any other solutions?
Thanks
Used to do that quite regularly when I had a big fridge. Different yeasts will react differently as they ferment, one may produce more heat as it ferments or finish quicker than the other, but not that much of an issue. The only major consideration that should be made is if one is a sluggish finisher and needs to be raised in temp a bit to cross the line will that play around too much with the other's fermentation. But for the most part, yeah, give it a go.
 

benno1973

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I wouldn't bother sandwiching the probe between the two fermenters, just measure the temperature of one of the brews and the other should be within 0.5C or so. Especially if you're using the same yeast. I'm assuming that you're pitching them at the same time?* Important to make sure that you've got decent air circulation in the fridge though, so you don't have warm/cold spots.


*If you're pitching at different times, you might want to ensure that the temp probe is taped to the fermenter with the most vigorous fermentation. That way, the other fermenter may only be slightly cooler. If that makes sense.
 

g-funke

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If you've got the spare coin and room in the fridge, this is what I use for a double batch: http://www.thebrewshop.com.au/carboy-fermenter-60litre.html Of course no good if doing different styles simultaneously.

I wouldn't bother sandwiching the probe between the two fermenters, just measure the temperature of one of the brews and the other should be within 0.5C or so. Especially if you're using the same yeast. I'm assuming that you're pitching them at the same time?* Important to make sure that you've got decent air circulation in the fridge though, so you don't have warm/cold spots.


*If you're pitching at different times, you might want to ensure that the temp probe is taped to the fermenter with the most vigorous fermentation. That way, the other fermenter may only be slightly cooler. If that makes sense.
Thanks mate. Yes, I'll be pitching at the same time.
I'm thinking I'll set the temp control to 18c so if there are any temp spikes, at least it will stay on the cooler side....
Cheers
 

thylacine

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Four fermenters (different recipes) at once in chest freezer. All ales (or lagers) and brewed over a week-end. Two weeks for ales, three for lagers. Then at least seven days chilling at 1c. Single temperature controller w/sensor hanging mid-point between the four. Pic shows an aquarium heater (for ales) in tub of water resting on top of the bottom two fermenters.

Cheers

Image044.jpg
 

Phoney

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I wouldn't bother sandwiching the probe between the two fermenters, just measure the temperature of one of the brews and the other should be within 0.5C or so. Especially if you're using the same yeast. I'm assuming that you're pitching them at the same time?* Important to make sure that you've got decent air circulation in the fridge though, so you don't have warm/cold spots.
I find mine can be a couple of degrees out. Im using a Westinghouse Silhouette stand up freezer, one fermenter sits on the floor and another on a shelf above it with a fan circulating the air. The one on the floor being the colder one. I think it's due to most of the cooling coils being located towards the bottom of the unit.

I still have two on the go simultaneously, I just factor in a cooler ferment for the lower deck.
 

numnum

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That's a bargain,mine was 60 bux all up.I chose the 2 piece bubbler for mine,it was extra.lol.
 

Guysmiley54

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Four fermenters (different recipes) at once in chest freezer. All ales (or lagers) and brewed over a week-end. Two weeks for ales, three for lagers. Then at least seven days chilling at 1c. Single temperature controller w/sensor hanging mid-point between the four. Pic shows an aquarium heater (for ales) in tub of water resting on top of the bottom two fermenters.

Cheers
I use cubes/jerry cans for no-chilling and can fit 2 in my ferment fridge. Problem is, how do you oxygenate the wort? I pour mine into the fermenter from a reasonable height and get foam just about flowing out of the fermenter. Any tips would be appreciated :)
 

glenwal

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I use cubes/jerry cans for no-chilling and can fit 2 in my ferment fridge. Problem is, how do you oxygenate the wort? I pour mine into the fermenter from a reasonable height and get foam just about flowing out of the fermenter. Any tips would be appreciated :)
When you're ready to ferment, open the cube to let air in, seal it back up and give it a shake.
 

Guysmiley54

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When you're ready to ferment, open the cube to let air in, seal it back up and give it a shake.
How full do you fill your cube? Mine is usually right to the tippy top. Not much airspace in there really, even after cooling.
 

glenwal

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How full do you fill your cube? Mine is usually right to the tippy top. Not much airspace in there really, even after cooling.
mine are normally around the 20l mark (in the 20L jerrys), so they have a few Ls of head space. i normally give them a squeeze when filling (to push out all the air), but this leaves enough space to shake and then ferment in the cube and gives me a full keg at the end.
 

steve78

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For what its worth, I always ferment two batches at once in an upright freezer, whether it be lagers or ales, and crash chill for about a week, u just have to time the finishes right that's all (reaching FG), especially if u do a diacetyl for lagers. I quite often make a 1065SG IPA with a 1050SG ale, and start to ferment the IPA a day or two before the ale, and they both finish relatively the same day, +/- one day. I stick the temp probe between some styrofoam strapped to the top fermenter. Two batches at once is no dramas at all, and very economical and simple, just get your finishing timing right and there should be no dramas, even with using different yeasts. Pouring the wort into the fermenter straight from the cube I have never had issues with oxidisation or anything.
Best of luck.
 

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