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Fermentation temps question

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Milk-lizard84

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Just a quick question from a brewer starting out.
Is fermentation temperature purely based on what yeast I am using or does the style of beer being brewed also come into the equation?
I'm in the process of completing a set up of a temp controlled fridge and just wanted to know people's thoughts.
Cheers
 

Judanero

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Kind of one and the same, what yeast you use usually depends on what style of beer your making (not always) but at different temps yeast can behave differently, ie ester production etc so you might intentionally ferment at the higher end of the yeasts temp range if looking to enhance certain characteristics of your wort. Hope that helps..

Cheers
 

Milk-lizard84

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Judanero said:
Kind of one and the same, what yeast you use usually depends on what style of beer your making (not always) but at different temps yeast can behave differently, ie ester production etc so you might intentionally ferment at the higher end of the yeasts temp range if looking to enhance certain characteristics of your wort. Hope that helps..

Cheers
 

Milk-lizard84

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Yeah that helps a lot. I'm just about to start a wheat beer and on the fact sheet I have it tells me that the recommended temp for fermentation is between 15 and 25c. I was kind of thinking 20 to 22 would be ideal.
 

bignath

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As menitoned above, you'd typically choose a yeast strain that is suitable for the beer your making, then ferment it at it's appropriate temp.

There are rules that can be broken though..

for example:
Ross does some great beers apparently fermenting with a swiss lager strain (S-189) but ferments it at temperatures for usually reserved for ales, with excellent results.
 

Bribie G

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Generally ales at around 20°, lagers 11° - however different yeast strains have different characteristics, as you'll find out if you get into liquid yeasts. For example Wyeast Irish Ale is quite happy chugging along at 22-24 ° and Wyeast Danish Lager can be started at 13° then allowed to drift up to 19° before cold conditioning (lagering). Some yeasts such as Wyeast Ringwood and Coopers bottle recultured yeast will produce one flavour profile if fermented at 18° and a quite different flavour - more estery - fermented at 22°.

What exact yeast are you using for the wheat?
 

peas_and_corn

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Yeah, the yeast strain makes a big impact. I like to use the Wyeast 3068 Weihenstephan at 23-24 because it throws up all sorts of banana esters which taste awesome, especially in a dunkelweissen. Read up on whatever yeast you are using and let the info inform what temperature to go for. There aren't many hard and fast rules when it comes to fermentation profiles.
 

Milk-lizard84

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Bribie I'm using a safbrew wb-06 yeast with a mangrove jack wheat beer. I have noticed some differences in tastes from the few beers I have done. I brewed 2 coopers Canadian blondes which sat at different temps during fermentation and the flavour was slightly different.
I'm hoping with a brew fridge I can keep constant temps instead of the fluctuating ones I've had thanks to a hot house and the perth climate.
Thanks for all the replies
 

Liam_snorkel

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Regarding wb-06: from my experience it can throw lots of clove flavours if fermented sub 20. Tastes a bit more bananary (no cloves) in the mid 20's.
 

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